Virome of Australia's most endangered parrot in captivity evidenced of harboring hitherto unknown viruses

Klukowski, Natalie, Eden, Paul, Uddin, Muhammad Jasim, and Sarker, Subir (2024) Virome of Australia's most endangered parrot in captivity evidenced of harboring hitherto unknown viruses. Microbiology Spectrum, 12 (1). 03052-23.

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Abstract

The detection of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) within endangered animal populations is increasing rapidly because of many factors, such as anthropogenic influences and climate change. Their impacts can be extensive and may further contribute to the processes risking the threat of extinction of these species. EIDs may be caused by a range of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi. However, detection and diagnosis can be challenging with limited knowledge of existing pathogens in endangered wildlife. The critically endangered orange-bellied parrot (OBP, Neophema chrysogaster), with as few as 70 wild individuals, is a species at risk of extinctions, yet little research has been conducted into their existing viral diversity (virome). To determine the virome in a subset of the captive OBP population, this study characterized the fecal virome using a viral metagenomic approach. Analysis of the generated sequence data sets identified 11 viruses belonging to the families Adenoviridae, Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Strikingly, eight viruses were detected in the OBPs housed in Aviary 1 compared to only three viruses in OBPs housed at Aviary 2. In addition to detecting six novel viruses, this study also demonstrated ongoing infection with psittacine siadenovirus F. This study highlights the need to broaden this research to other populations of this species. Further virome characterization of co-habiting birds could also identify potential novel viruses and provide insight into their evolutionary relationship. These findings may contribute to strategic management and biosecurity plans for the conservation of endangered parrots.

Item ID: 82035
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2165-0497
Keywords: evolution, metagenomics, Neophema birds, orange-bellied parrot, virome
Copyright Information: Copyright © 2023 Klukowski et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license.
Funders: Australian Research Council (ARC)
Projects and Grants: ARC DE200100367
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2024 03:30
FoR Codes: 30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3009 Veterinary sciences > 300914 Veterinary virology @ 50%
31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3107 Microbiology > 310706 Virology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 28 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 2801 Expanding knowledge > 280102 Expanding knowledge in the biological sciences @ 100%
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