A genomic view of the reef-building coral Porites lutea and its microbial symbionts

Robbins, Steven J., Singleton, Caitlin M., Chan, Cheong Xin, Messer, Lauren F., Geers, Aileen U., Ying, Hua, Baker, Alexander, Bell, Sara C., Morrow, Kathleen M., Ragan, Mark A., Miller, David J., Forêt, Sylvain, Voolstra, Christian R., Tyson, Gene W., Bourne, David G., Ball, Eldon, Beeden, Roger, Berumen, Michael, Aranda, Manuel, Ravasi, Timothy, Bongaerts, Pim, Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove, Cooke, Ira, Leggat, Bill, Sprungala, Susanne, Fitzgerald, Anna, Shang, Catherine, Lundgren, Petra, Fyffe, Theresa, Rubino, Francesco, van Oppen, Madeleine, Weynberg, Karen, and Bells, Sara C. (2019) A genomic view of the reef-building coral Porites lutea and its microbial symbionts. Nature Microbiology, 4 (12). pp. 2090-2100.

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Abstract

Corals and the reef ecosystems that they support are in global decline due to increasing anthropogenic pressures such as climate change(1). However, effective reef conservation strategies are hampered by a limited mechanistic understanding of coral biology and the functional roles of the diverse microbial communities that underpin coral health(2,3). Here,we present an integrated genomic characterization of the coral species Porites lutea and its microbial partners. High-quality genomes were recovered from P. lutea, as well as a metagenome-assembled Cladocopium C15 (the dinoflagellate symbiont) and 52 bacterial and archaeal populations. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that many of the bacterial and archaeal genomes encode motifs that may be involved in maintaining association with the coral host and in supplying fixed carbon, B-vitamins and amino acids to their eukaryotic partners. Furthermore, mechanisms for ammonia, urea, nitrate, dimethylsulfonio-propionate and taurine transformation were identified that interlink members of the holobiont and may be important for nutrient acquisition and retention in oligotrophic waters. Our findings demonstrate the critical and diverse roles that microorganisms play within the coral holobiont and underscore the need to consider all of the components of the holobiont if we are to effectively inform reef conservation strategies.

Item ID: 61221
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2058-5276
Copyright Information: © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited 2019.
Funders: Great Barrier Reef Foundation (GBRF), National Collaborative Research Infrstructure Structure, Rio Tinto, ARC Queen Elizabeth II Fellowship (ARC QEF), ARC Future Fellowship (ARC FF), ReFuGe2020 Consortium, ARC Discovery Project (ARC DP), Australian Research Council (ARC), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
Projects and Grants: GBRF Resilient Coral Reefs Successfully Adapting to Climate Change Program, ARC QEF DP1093175, ARC FF FT170100070, ARC DP DP160103811, ARC DP150101875, ARC CE140100020
Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2019 07:56
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0604 Genetics > 060408 Genomics @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960305 Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change @ 100%
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