Plant systematics and biogeography in the Australasian tropics

Crayn, Darren M. (2018) Plant systematics and biogeography in the Australasian tropics. Australian Systematic Botany, 31 (5-6). i-iii.

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Abstract

[Extract] It has been recognised for centuries that the majority of species are found in the tropics. The reasons are the subject of much debate, especially regarding the roles of temperature and time (Brown 2014), but whatever the causes, it is undeniable that the tropics teem with species known and unknown.

Of all tropical areas, the Neotropics stands out for its exceptional taxon richness and rates of diversification (Antonelli et al. 2015). Whereas the Australasian tropics cannot match the species numbers of the Neotropics except perhaps for trees (Slik et al. 2015), it does boast the world's largest tropical island (New Guinea), among the largest and most intact tropical savannahs (Woinarski et al. 2007), the greatest concentration of basal angiosperm lineages (Metcalfe and Ford 2009) and the most species-rich mangroves (Daru et al. 2013). These landscapes are not just rich in species, but also exhibit high levels of phylogenetic diversity and phylogenetic endemism (Thornhill et al. 2016).

Item ID: 56755
Item Type: Article (Editorial)
ISSN: 1446-5701
Date Deposited: 02 Jan 2019 07:36
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0603 Evolutionary Biology > 060302 Biogeography and Phylogeography @ 40%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0603 Evolutionary Biology > 060310 Plant Systematics and Taxonomy @ 40%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0603 Evolutionary Biology > 060309 Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis @ 20%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences @ 100%
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