Extreme weather likely behind worst recorded mangrove dieback in northern Australia

Van Oosterzee, Penny, and Duke, Norman (2017) Extreme weather likely behind worst recorded mangrove dieback in northern Australia. The Conversation, 14 March 2017. pp. 1-6.

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Abstract

[Extract] One of the worst instances of mangrove forest dieback ever recorded globally struck Australia’s Gulf of Carpentaria in the summer of 2015-16. A combination of extreme temperatures, drought and lowered sea levels likely caused this dieback, according to our investigation published in the journal Marine and Freshwater Research. The dieback, which coincided with the Great Barrier Reef’s worst ever bleaching event, affected 1,000km of coastline between the Roper River in the Northern Territory and Karumba in Queensland. About 7,400 hectares, or 6%, of the gulf’s mangrove forest had died. Losses were most severe in the NT, where around 5,500ha of mangroves suffered dieback. Some of the gulf’s many catchments, such as the Robinson and McArthur rivers, lost up to 26% of their mangroves.

Item ID: 48922
Item Type: Article (Commentary)
Keywords: mangroves; habitat; dieback; extensive; damage; impact; moisture stress; sea level drop; Gulf of Carpentaria; Queensland; Northern Territory; Australia; IWP
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Date Deposited: 03 Jul 2017 22:49
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050204 Environmental Impact Assessment @ 40%
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