Altitude decreases testis weight of a frog (Rana kukunoris) on the Tibetan plateau

Chen, Wei, Pike, David A., He, Dujuan, Wang, Ying, Ren, Lina, Wang, Xinyi, Fan, Xiaogang, and Lu, Xin (2014) Altitude decreases testis weight of a frog (Rana kukunoris) on the Tibetan plateau. Herpetological Journal, 24 (3). pp. 183-188.

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Abstract

Producing sperm is energetically inexpensive, and strong competition for mating partners can lead to increased size of the testes in an effort to enhance reproductive success. On the other hand, selection on testes size can also be imposed by environmental conditions. We studied altitudinal variation and directional asymmetry in testis weight in a high-altitude frog (Rana kukunoris) endemic to the Tibetan plateau (2300–3500 m altitude). Testis weight decreased with increasing altitude and body size. The left testis was significantly larger than the right testis for all populations, and relative asymmetry between testes was unrelated to altitude or body size. The harsh environmental conditions at high altitudes may constrain the ability of males to allocate energy towards increased testis size. They could also be associated with altered operational sex ratios, thus reducing the strength of male-male competition.

Item ID: 36708
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: altitude, Anura, directional asymmetry, energy allocation, Rana kukunoris, reproduction, testes
ISSN: 0268-0130
Funders: Mianyang Normal University (MNU), Sichuan Provincial Department of Education (SPDE)
Projects and Grants: MNU 2011A17 and QD2012A13, SPDE 11ZB138
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2014 07:54
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0501 Ecological Applications > 050101 Ecological Impacts of Climate Change @ 40%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060208 Terrestrial Ecology @ 60%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960305 Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change @ 100%
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