Juvenile ribbontail stingray, Taeniura lymma (ForsskAyenl, 1775) (Chondrichthyes, Dasyatidae), demonstrate a unique suite of physiological adaptations to survive hyperthermic nursery conditions

Dabruzzi, Theresa F., Bennett, Wayne A., Rummer, Jodie L., and Fangue, Nann A. (2013) Juvenile ribbontail stingray, Taeniura lymma (ForsskAyenl, 1775) (Chondrichthyes, Dasyatidae), demonstrate a unique suite of physiological adaptations to survive hyperthermic nursery conditions. Hydrobiologia, 701 (1). pp. 37-49.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10750-012-124...
 
4
8


Abstract

Juvenile ribbontail stingrays, Taeniura lymma (Forsskål, 1775) of the tropical West Pacific inhabit mangal and seagrass nurseries that often experience rapid and extreme increases in water temperature. We hypothesized that juvenile rays possess a thermal strategy similar to other hyperthermic specialists, in which fish prefer high temperatures, are always prepared for thermal extremes regardless of previous thermal history, and exhibit low metabolic thermal sensitivity. Critical thermal methodology was used to determine the thermal niche, and a thermal gradient used to estimate stingray final preferendum. Temperature quotients (Q₁₀) were calculated from metabolic rates determined at three temperatures using flow-through respirometry. As predicted, juvenile rays showed a relatively small thermal niche dominated by intrinsic tolerance with limited capacity for acclimation. Thermal preference values were higher than those reported for other elasmobranch species. Interestingly, the temperature quotient for juvenile rays was higher than expected, suggesting that these fish may have the ability to exploit the thermal heterogeneity in their environment. Temperature likely acts as a directing factor in this species, separating warm tolerant juveniles from adults living in deeper, cooler waters.

Item ID: 25066
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: temperature preference, Q(10), metabolism, temperature tolerance polygon, CTM, Elasmobranch
ISSN: 1573-5117
Funders: University of West Florida Research and Sponsored Programs, Department of Biology, University of California Agricultural Experiment Station
Date Deposited: 20 Feb 2013 09:26
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060203 Ecological Physiology @ 50%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0606 Physiology > 060604 Comparative Physiology @ 20%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0501 Ecological Applications > 050101 Ecological Impacts of Climate Change @ 30%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960301 Climate Change Adaptation Measures @ 40%
97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences @ 60%
Downloads: Total: 8
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page