Locus, 2006

Gough, Julie A. (2006) Locus, 2006. [Artefact]

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Abstract

This work is constructed from a conglomerate of materials and forms that have shaped me. A forests of tea-tree sticks, a mound of cuttlefish; wave, a midden, a coastline, the sea currents and star systems, the blink of an eye. These elements merge to represent the places and stories that impact on my everyday. The point of juncture, between past and present, offers me practical ways to inculcate and make sense of my childhood, raised besides a noisy amusement park (St Kilda Luna Park), and of my maternal Indigenous, Trawlwoolway, family ancestry on coastal north eastern Tasmania, amidst tea-tree and she-oak and brilliant night skies. Making physical renditions of how we create ourselves from our own and inherited stories interests me; figuring ways to render distinct, sometimes blurred and disassociated personal and public memories is an ongoing process.

Research Statement

Research Background In 2005 Dr Charles Merewether asked me, following a presentation I made at ANU, for images and details of my artwork. I forwarded a CD and later understood he was the curator of the upcoming Sydney Biennale. Merewether asked for a project concept for potential inclusion in the Biennale. The Biennale: Zones of Contact exhibited art that related different individual’s concerns often affiliated with their culture about memory, self and public identity, and power. The 2006 Biennale of Sydney featured the work of 85 artists from 44 countries and was held across 16 venues throughout Sydney.
Research Contribution My work for the Biennale: Locus provided the opportunity for me to interrelate in one large work some otherwise distinct concepts about inheritance of identity and place within and beyond one generation. The Biennale enabled my usual research focus - the creation of 3D structures based on and furthering historic narrative beyond the archival - to be explored at a large scale and be exposed to an international audience. The resulting critical engagement and feedback, has in turn provided further opportunities.
Research Significance The significance of the Biennale exhibition to my research has been its impact in broadening my work practice and in more actively seeking opportunities and working with peers across disciplines. I am currently engaged in a Manning Clark residential Fellowship transcribing towards publication of colonial papers at the National Library of Australia. This fellowship will result in broader critical research skills, working across broad networks to produce outcomes both text and art based.
Item ID: 5067
Item Type: Artefact
Additional Information:

Dr Charles Merewether [Artistic Director & Curator].

Media of Output: Sculpture
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Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2009 04:00
FoR Codes: 19 STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING > 1905 Visual Arts and Crafts > 190502 Fine Arts (incl Sculpture and Painting) @ 100%
SEO Codes: 95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9501 Arts and Leisure > 950104 The Creative Arts (incl. Graphics and Craft) @ 100%
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