Location, culture and technology: the uniform, random, inequitable music education system in Queensland schools, 1930 to 1940

Cole, Malcolm (2011) Location, culture and technology: the uniform, random, inequitable music education system in Queensland schools, 1930 to 1940. In: Proceedings of XVIII National Conference, pp. 122-127. From: XVIII National Conference: making sound waves: diversity, unity, equity, 2-5 July 2011, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.

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Abstract

The impact of the local environment on the cultural practices of particular and diverse communities with regard to musical experience and learning is being increasingly recognised in music education studies. As well, new technologies create new ways of interacting with and experiencing music. How do music educators ride this broad wave that incorporates the local, the global, the cultural, the technological and the personal? These issues that surround music teachers of the 21st century are not new as the teachers and students in Far North Queensland in the 1930s faced a remarkably similar set of circumstances. Cairns and the Aboriginal mission at Yarrabah in 1930 were remote, small, very different townships in Far North Queensland with culturally diverse populations. They are presented as examples of the state of music teaching, where teachers struggled to implement music education syllabus content in both government and non-government schools for a variety of reasons. There was no recognition of diverse cultural practices in schools and music teacher training was not cohesive or adequately resourced and supported. While technology helped in some ways, it presented new problems as well. The paper will show that effective music education was, by and large, a hit and miss affair throughout the State despite the good intentions embedded in the new syllabus of 1930. It draws parallels with music educators of today and concludes by asking how much has really changed in music education in Queensland since 1930.

Item ID: 21638
Item Type: Conference Item (Refereed Research Paper - E1)
Related URLs:
ISBN: 978-0-9803792-2-8
Date Deposited: 19 Apr 2012 05:13
FoR Codes: 19 STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING > 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing > 190407 Music Performance @ 30%
13 EDUCATION > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy > 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy @ 40%
21 HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY > 2103 Historical Studies > 210303 Australian History (excl Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History) @ 30%
SEO Codes: 93 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 9305 Education and Training Systems > 930599 Education and Training Systems not elsewhere classified @ 30%
97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education @ 40%
93 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 9301 Learner and Learning > 930102 Learner and Learning Processes @ 30%
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