Scientific foundations for an ecosystem goal, milestones and indicators for the post-2020 global biodiversity framework

Nicholson, Emily, Watermeyer, Kate, Rowland, Jessica A., Sato, Chloe F., Stevenson, Simone L., Andrade, Angela, Brooks, Thomas M., Burgess, Neil D., Cheng, Su Ting, Grantham, Hedley S., Hill, Samantha, Keith, David A., Maron, Martine, Metzke, Daniel, Murray, Nicholas J., Nelson, Cara R., Obura, David, Plumptre, Andrew, Skowno, Andrew, and Watson, James E.M. (2021) Scientific foundations for an ecosystem goal, milestones and indicators for the post-2020 global biodiversity framework. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 5 (10). pp. 1338-1349.

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Abstract

Despite substantial conservation efforts, the loss of ecosystems continues globally, along with related declines in species and nature’s contributions to people. An effective ecosystem goal, supported by clear milestones, targets and indicators, is urgently needed for the post-2020 global biodiversity framework and beyond to support biodiversity conservation, the UN Sustainable Development Goals and efforts to abate climate change. Here, we describe the scientific foundations for an ecosystem goal and milestones, founded on a theory of change, and review available indicators to measure progress. An ecosystem goal should include three core components: area, integrity and risk of collapse. Targets—the actions that are necessary for the goals to be met—should address the pathways to ecosystem loss and recovery, including safeguarding remnants of threatened ecosystems, restoring their area and integrity to reduce risk of collapse and retaining intact areas. Multiple indicators are needed to capture the different dimensions of ecosystem area, integrity and risk of collapse across all ecosystem types, and should be selected for their fitness for purpose and relevance to goal components. Science-based goals, supported by well-formulated action targets and fit-for-purpose indicators, will provide the best foundation for reversing biodiversity loss and sustaining human well-being.

Item ID: 70072
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2397-334X
Copyright Information: © Springer Nature Limited 2021
Funders: Australian Research Council (ARC), MAVA Foundation, Veski Inspiring Women Fellowship, Office of the Chief Scientist of Victoria, IUCN Red List of Ecosystems
Projects and Grants: ARC DE190100101, ARC FT190100234, ARC LP170101143, ARC DP170100609
Date Deposited: 26 May 2022 00:21
FoR Codes: 41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4104 Environmental management > 410401 Conservation and biodiversity @ 50%
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4102 Ecological applications > 410203 Ecosystem function @ 20%
31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3199 Other biological sciences > 319902 Global change biology @ 30%
SEO Codes: 19 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND NATURAL HAZARDS > 1905 Understanding climate change > 190507 Global effects of climate change (excl. Australia, New Zealand, Antarctica and the South Pacific) (excl. social impacts) @ 20%
19 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND NATURAL HAZARDS > 1999 Other environmental policy, climate change and natural hazards > 199999 Other environmental policy, climate change and natural hazards not elsewhere classified @ 40%
19 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND NATURAL HAZARDS > 1902 Environmental policy, legislation and standards > 190299 Environmental policy, legislation and standards not elsewhere classified @ 40%
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