Quantifying social-ecological scale mismatches suggests people should be managed at broader scales than ecosystems

Cumming, Graeme, and Dobbs, Kirstin A. (2020) Quantifying social-ecological scale mismatches suggests people should be managed at broader scales than ecosystems. One Earth, 3 (2). pp. 251-259.

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Abstract

Mapping permits and ecological data across the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park allowed us to quantify and rigorously compare interacting social and ecological scales. Institutions (permits) and ecological systems both varied at multiple scales. The scales of permissions were typically bimodal and larger than ecological scales. Thus, we propose that effective management may have to occur at broader scales than ecological variation. Further comparable examples are needed for establishing the generality of this proposition.

Item ID: 66746
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2590-3322
Keywords: coral reef, ecosystem, fit, governance, institution, management, resilience, scaling, social-ecological system, sustainability
Copyright Information: © 2020 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Funders: James S. McDonnell Foundation, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2021 04:31
FoR Codes: 31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3103 Ecology > 310305 Marine and estuarine ecology (incl. marine ichthyology) @ 100%
SEO Codes: 18 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT > 1805 Marine systems and management > 180504 Marine biodiversity @ 100%
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