Severe dehydration among cholera patients in Yemen: a cohort profile

Alassar, Mohammed, Adegboye, Oyelola, Emeto, Theophilus, Rahman, Kazi, Mashood, Lawal, and Elfaki, Faiz (2020) Severe dehydration among cholera patients in Yemen: a cohort profile. Germs, 10 (4). pp. 338-345.

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Abstract

Introduction: Cholera, an acute diarrheal illness caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with Vibrio cholerae, is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The occurrence of outbreaks of cholera are difficult to prevent in low and middle-income countries, especially those under armed conflicts.

Methods: This study aimed to describe the characteristics of a cohort of inpatients with cholera in two main hospitals in Taiz and Sana’a, Yemen, between 3rd February 2017 and 8th December 2017. Patient data were entered into an excel database and analyzed using STATA 16.1. Descriptive summaries of patient’s data were presented as frequencies and percentages. Patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics were compared using the Chi-square test.

Results: Preliminary findings from 172 hospitalizations for cholera during the study period include 163 that were severely dehydrated (94.8%). Age, education, hand hygiene, sanitation, water source, stool content and malnutrition were significantly associated with severe dehydration.

Conclusions: This data contributes to a greater understanding of the associated risk factors for the occurrence of the infectious disease in the study region. Future study will analyze the risks for severe dehydration and diarrhea, and the associated healthcare costs.

Item ID: 65686
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2248-2997
Keywords: Cholera, diarrhea, Yemen, war and conflicts, hand hygiene, sanitation, safe drinking water
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Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2021 02:53
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420202 Disease surveillance @ 80%
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420603 Health promotion @ 20%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920407 Health Protection and/or Disaster Response @ 30%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920406 Food Safety @ 30%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920404 Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response) @ 40%
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