Interactions of sprint interval exercise and psychological need-support on subsequent food intake among physically inactive men and women

Beer, Natalya J., Dimmock, James A., Jackson, Ben, and Guelfi, Kym J. (2020) Interactions of sprint interval exercise and psychological need-support on subsequent food intake among physically inactive men and women. Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 45 (8). pp. 835-844.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sprint interval training (SIT) and psychological need-support in exercise on postexercise appetite and energy intake. Forty physically inactive men and women (body mass index, 24.6 ± 4.8 kg·m−2; peak oxygen consumption, 26.6 ± 4.9 mL·kg−1·min−1) were randomised to either a need-support or no-support condition, with each participant completing 2 experimental trials involving 30 min of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT; 60% peak oxygen consumption) and SIT (alternating 15 s at 170% peak oxygen consumption and 60 s at 32% peak oxygen consumption) matched for total work. Perceptions of appetite and appetite-related blood variables were assessed, together with ad libitum energy intake for 3 h following exercise using a laboratory test meal and available snacks. Greater enjoyment, perceived exertion, heart rate, and blood lactate were observed in SIT compared with MICT (all p ≤ 0.006). Ratings of perceived appetite were similar across conditions and trials (p > 0.05); however, active ghrelin was lower following SIT compared with MICT (p < 0.001), and there was a significant condition-by-type interaction for energy intake (p = 0.033), with participants in the support group consuming less energy from foods following SIT (1895 ± 1040 kJ) than MICT (2475 ± 1192 kJ). Findings from this work highlight the need to reconsider traditional exercise guidelines where dietary intake is a concern.

Item ID: 63984
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1715-5320
Keywords: high-intensity intermittent exercise, appetite, energy intake, compensation, exercise motivation, appetite-regulating hormones
Copyright Information: Copyright remains with the author(s) or their institution(s).
Funders: Sports Medicine Australia
Projects and Grants: Research Foundation Award
Date Deposited: 04 Aug 2020 05:10
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology @ 50%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920411 Nutrition @ 100%
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