Early childhood anaemia more than doubles the risk of developmental vulnerability at school-age among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children of remote Far North Queensland: findings of a retrospective cohort study

Leonard, Dympna, Beuttner, Petra, Thompson, Fintan, Makrides, Maria, and McDermott, Robyn (2020) Early childhood anaemia more than doubles the risk of developmental vulnerability at school-age among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children of remote Far North Queensland: findings of a retrospective cohort study. Nutrition and Dietetics, 77 (3). pp. 298-309.

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Abstract

Aims: Early childhood anaemia, usually attributed to iron deficiency, is associated with persistent detrimental effects on child development. This study investigates the association of anaemia between age six and 23 months with indicators of childhood development at school-age among children of remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of Far North Queensland.

Methods: The triennial Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) encompasses five domains of early childhood development—physical health and wellbeing, social competence, emotional maturity, language and cognitive skills (school-based), communication skills and general knowledge. AEDC 2012 and 2015 assessments were linked with health information for children and their mothers from remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of Far North Queensland.

Results: AEDC assessments were available for 250 children who had measurements of haemoglobin recorded at age 6 to 23 months. More children who had had early childhood anaemia (n = 66/143, 46.2%, [37.9%, 54.4%]) were developmentally vulnerable on two or more domains compared to those who had not been anaemic (n = 25/107, 23.4% [15.2%, 31.5%], P < .001). Multivariable analysis confirmed that early childhood anaemia more than doubled the risk of developmental vulnerability (OR 2.2 [1.1, 4.3] P = .020) at school age.

Conclusions: Early childhood anaemia is a risk factor for developmental vulnerability at school-age in this setting. Interventions combining nutrition promotion and multi-micronutrient food fortification, are effective in prevention of early childhood anaemia. Such interventions could also improve early childhood development and subsequent educational achievement.

Item ID: 63664
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1747-6368
Copyright Information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in anymedium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. © 2020 The Authors.Nutrition & Dieteticspublished by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Dietitians Association of Australia.
Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC APP1092732
Date Deposited: 05 Aug 2020 03:44
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics > 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9203 Indigenous Health > 920302 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Health Status and Outcomes @ 100%
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