Elevated CO₂ and food ration affect growth but not the size-based hierarchy of a reef fish

McMahon, Shannon, Munday, Philip L., Wong, Marian Y.L., and Donelson, Jennifer (2019) Elevated CO₂ and food ration affect growth but not the size-based hierarchy of a reef fish. Scientific Reports, 9. 19706.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (1MB) | Preview
View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-56002...
 
62


Abstract

Under projected levels of ocean acidification, shifts in energetic demands and food availability could interact to effect the growth and development of marine organisms. Changes to individual growth rates could then flow on to influence emergent properties of social groups, particularly in species that form size-based hierarchies. To test the potential interactive effects of (1) food availability, (2) elevated CO₂ during juvenile development, and (3) parental experience of elevated CO₂ on the growth, condition and size-based hierarchy of juvenile fish, we reared orange clownfish (Amphiprion percula) for 50 days post-hatching in a fully orthogonal design. Development in elevated CO₂ reduced standard length and weight of juveniles, by 9% and 11% respectively, compared to ambient. Development under low food availability reduced length and weight of juveniles by 7% and 15% respectively, compared to high food. Parental exposure to elevated CO₂ restored the length of juveniles to that of controls, but it did not restore weight, resulting in juveniles from elevated CO₂ parents exhibiting 33% lower body condition when reared in elevated CO₂. The body size ratios (relative size of a fish from the rank above) within juvenile groups were not affected by any treatment, suggesting relative robustness of group-level structure despite alterations in individual size and condition. This study demonstrates that both food availability and elevated CO₂ can influence the physical attributes of juvenile reef fish, but these changes may not disrupt the emergent group structure of this social species, at least amongst juveniles.

Item ID: 61656
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2045-2322
Copyright Information: © 2019, The Author(s).
Funders: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
Research Data: http://dx.doi.org/10.25903/5df182c2f5350
Date Deposited: 05 May 2020 22:15
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0501 Ecological Applications > 050101 Ecological Impacts of Climate Change @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960305 Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 62
Last 12 Months: 41
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page