Physiological characteristics, self-perceptions, and parental support of physical activity in children with, or at risk of, developmental coordination disorder

Wright, Kemi E., Furzer, Bonnie J., Licari, Melissa K., Thornton, Ashleigh L., Dimmock, James A., Naylor, Louise H., Reid, Siobhan L., Kwan, Stephanie R., and Jackson, Ben (2019) Physiological characteristics, self-perceptions, and parental support of physical activity in children with, or at risk of, developmental coordination disorder. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 84. pp. 66-74.

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Abstract

Children with low movement proficiency have been identified as having poorer physiological and psychosocial outcomes; however, the varied measurement approaches used to assess these outcomes have varied resulting in conflicting evidence regarding the presence and magnitude of differences compared to Typically Developing (TD) children. Additionally, there has been limited research into the role of parental support for physical activity (PA) in this group. We compared children with varying levels of movement proficiency on physiological characteristics and self-perceptions regarding PA. In addition, these children's parents were compared on physiological characteristics and support of their children's PA. Children (N = 117) aged 6 to 12 years, along with their parent/guardian, participated in this study. Children were classified according to the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 test (Typically Developing (TD) = 60; At Risk = 19; Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) = 38). Children's PA, muscle strength, cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF), body composition, and self-perceptions regarding PA were assessed, with parents assessed on CRF, body composition, and PA support. Compared to TD children, children with DCD had lower PA (p = 0.036), predilection (p ≤0.001) and adequacy (p ≤0.001) regarding PA, higher body fat percentage (p = 0.019), and received less logistic support (i.e., transportation) from their parents (p = 0.012). TD children had increased muscle strength compared to the DCD (p ≤ 0.001) and At Risk (p ≤ 0.001) groups. Results indicated that, relative to TD children, children with DCD have multiple physiological deficits, receive less parental logistic support for PA involvement, and report lower scores on psychological constructs that are predictive of PA involvement.

Item ID: 61539
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1873-3379
Keywords: Developmental Coordination Disorder, Movement proficiency, Parent support, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Self-perceptions
Copyright Information: © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2020 23:27
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology @ 50%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920205 Health Education and Promotion @ 50%
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