Global spatial risk assessment of sharks under the footprint of fisheries

Queiroz, Nuno, Humphries, Nicolas E., Couto, Ana, Vedor, Marisa, da Costa, Ivo, Sequeira, Ana M.M., Mucientes, Gonzalo, Santos, Antonio M., Abascal, Francisco J., Abercrombie, Debra L., Abrantes, Katya, Acuña-Marrero, David, Afonso, André S., Afonso, Pedro, Anders, Darrell, Araujo, Gonzalo, Arauz, Randall, Bach, Pascal, Barnett, Adam, Bernal, Diego, Berumen, Michael L., Lion, Sandra Bessudo, Bezerra, Natalia P.A., Blaison, Antonin V., Block, Barbara A., Bond, Mark E., Bonfil, Ramón, Bradford, Russell W., Braun, Camrin D., Brooks, Edward J., Brooks, Annabelle, Brown, Judith, Bruce, Barry D., Byrne, Michael E., Campana, Steven E., Carlisle, Aaron B., Chapman, Demian D., Chapple, Taylor K., Chisholm, John, Clarke, Christopher R., Clua, Eric G., Cochran, Jesse E.M., Crochelet, Estelle C., Dagorn, Laurent, Daly, Ryan, Cortés, Daniel Devia, Doyle, Thomas K., Drew, Michael, Duffy, Clinton A. J., Erikson, Thor, Espinoza, Eduardo, Ferreira, Luciana C., Ferretti, Francesco, Filmalter, John D., Fischer, G. Chris, Fitzpatrick, Richard, Fontes, Jorge, Forget, Fabien, Fowler, Mark, Francis, Malcolm P., Gallagher, Austin J., Gennari, Enrico, Goldsworthy, Simon D., Gollock, Matthew J., Green, Jonathan R., Gustafson, Johan A., Guttridge, Tristan L., Guzman, Hector M., Hammerschlag, Neil, Harman, Luke, Hazin, Fabio H. V., Heard, Matthew, Hearn, Alex R., Holdsworth, John C., Holmes, Bonnie J., Howey, Lucy A., Hoyos, Mauricio, Hueter, Robert E., Hussey, Nigel E., Huveneers, Charlie, Irion, Dylan T., Jacoby, David M. P., Jewell, Oliver J. D., Johnson, Ryan, Jordan, Lance K. B., Jorgensen, Salvador J., Joyce, Warren, Daly, Clare A. Keating, Ketchum, James T., Klimley, A. Peter, Kock, Alison A., Koen, Pieter, Ladino, Felipe, Lana, Fernanda O., Lea, James S. E., Llewellyn, Fiona, Lyon, Warrick S., MacDonnell, Anna, Macena, Bruno C. L., Marshall, Heather, McAllister, Jaime D., McAuley, Rory, Meyer, Michael A., Morris, John J., Nelson, Emily R., Papastamatiou, Yannis P., Patterson, Toby A., Penaherrera-Palma, Cesar, Pepperell, Julian G., Pierce, Simon J., Poisson, Francois, Quintero, Lina Maria, Richardson, Andrew J., Rogers, Paul J., Rohner, Christoph A., Rowat, David R. L., Samoilys, Melita, Semmens, Jayson M., Sheaves, Marcus, Shillinger, George, Shivji, Mahmood, Singh, Sarika, Skomal, Gregory B., Smale, Malcolm J., Snyders, Laurenne B., Soler, German, Soria, Marc, Stehfest, Kilian M., Stevens, John D., Thorrold, Simon R., Tolotti, Mariana T., Towner, Alison, Travassos, Paulo, Tyminski, John P., Vandeperre, Frederic, Vaudo, Jeremy J., Watanabe, Yuuki Y., Weber, Sam B., Wetherbee, Bradley M., White, Timothy D., Williams, Sean, Zarate, Patricia M., Harcourt, Robert, Hays, Graeme C., Meekan, Mark G., Thums, Michele, Irigoien, Xabier, Eguiluz, Victor M., Duarte, Carlos M., Sousa, Lara L., Simpson, Samantha J., Southall, Emily J., and Sims, David W. (2019) Global spatial risk assessment of sharks under the footprint of fisheries. Nature, 572 (7770). pp. 461-466.

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Abstract

Effective ocean management and the conservation of highly migratory species depend on resolving the overlap between animal movements and distributions, and fishing effort. However, this information is lacking at a global scale. Here we show, using a big-data approach that combines satellite-tracked movements of pelagic sharks and global fishing fleets, that 24% of the mean monthly space used by sharks falls under the footprint of pelagic longline fisheries. Space-use hotspots of commercially valuable sharks and of internationally protected species had the highest overlap with longlines (up to 76% and 64%, respectively), and were also associated with significant increases in fishing effort. We conclude that pelagic sharks have limited spatial refuge from current levels of fishing effort in marine areas beyond national jurisdictions (the high seas). Our results demonstrate an urgent need for conservation and management measures at high-seas hotspots of shark space use, and highlight the potential of simultaneous satellite surveillance of megafauna and fishers as a tool for near-real-time, dynamic management.

Item ID: 60420
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1476-4687
Copyright Information: Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited 2019
Funders: Marine Biological Association (MBA), UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), Save Our Seas Foundation, European Regional Development Fund (FEDER), Norte Portugal Regional Operational Programme (NORTE 2020), FCT Investigator Fellowship, Australian Research Council (ARC), Australian Institute for Marine Science (AIMS)
Projects and Grants: NE/R00997X/1, PTDC/MAR/100345/2008, COMPETE FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-010580, NORTE-01-0145-FEDER-000031, FCT IF/01611/2013, FCT PD/ BD/52603/2014, FCT PTDC/MAR-BIO/4458/2012, ARC DE170100841
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2019 07:33
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity @ 50%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology) @ 50%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960507 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Marine Environments @ 80%
96 ENVIRONMENT > 9607 Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards > 960701 Coastal and Marine Management Policy @ 20%
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