Low recruitment due to altered settlement substrata as primary constraint for coral communities under ocean acidification

Fabricius, Katharina E., Noonan, Sam H.C., Abrego, David, Harrington, Lindsay, and De'Ath, Glenn (2017) Low recruitment due to altered settlement substrata as primary constraint for coral communities under ocean acidification. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B, Biological Sciences, 284 (1862).

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.1536
 
9
1


Abstract

The future of coral reefs under increasing CO2 depends on their capacity to recover from disturbances. To predict the recovery potential of coral communities that are fully acclimatized to elevated CO2, we compared the relative success of coral recruitment and later life stages at two volcanic CO2 seeps and adjacent control sites in Papua New Guinea. Our field experiments showed that the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on coral recruitment rates were up to an order of magnitude greater than the effects on the survival and growth of established corals. Settlement rates, recruit and juvenile densities were best predicted by the presence of crustose coralline algae, as opposed to the direct effects of seawater CO2. Offspring from high CO2 acclimatized parents had similarly impaired settlement rates as offspring from control parents. For most coral taxa, field data showed no evidence of cumulative and compounding detrimental effects of high CO2 on successive life stages, and three taxa showed improved adult performance at high CO2 that compensated for their low recruitment rates. Our data suggest that severely declining capacity for reefs to recover, due to altered settlement substrata and reduced coral recruitment, is likely to become a dominant mechanism of how OA will alter coral reefs.

Item ID: 50862
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1471-2954
Keywords: reef resilience, carbon dioxide, coral reproduction, climate change, scleractinian corals, crustose coralline algae
Funders: Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), Great Barrier Reef Foundation (GBRF)
Projects and Grants: GBRF Resilient Coral Reefs Successfully Adapting to Climate Change Program
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2017 07:32
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050206 Environmental Monitoring @ 50%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology) @ 50%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960507 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Marine Environments @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 1
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page