Challenging myths: what is the difference between teaching children social behaviours and telling children the social behaviours? How are the differences translated in child outcomes?

Dasson, Merilyn, and Carter, Margaret Anne (2014) Challenging myths: what is the difference between teaching children social behaviours and telling children the social behaviours? How are the differences translated in child outcomes? In: Living in Harmony Through Early Childhoon Education and Care: PECERA 2014: 15th Annual Pacific Early Childhood Education Research Association Conference. A5.010. p. 224. From: PECERA 2014: 15th Annual Pacific Early Childhood Education Research Association Conference, 8-10 August 2014, Bali, Indonesia.

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Abstract

Early years educators across six Catholic early years schools in Singapore embarked on a journey of discovery, examining two questions: What is the difference between teaching children social behaviours and telling children social behaviour? How are the differences translated in child outcomes?

Educators were introduced to four socialization styles and the child outcomes associated with these styles: authoritarian, permissive, training, and authoritative. The authoritarian paradigm, based on external control, sees the child as an empty vessel, promoting unquestioned compliance, and stimulus-response thinking. Whilst authoritarian styles are teacher centered, the opposite is extreme leniency associated with an overly child centered permissive approach. Rarely are there social rules or behaviour expectations, with children making their own decisions and acting on them in any way they please. Training combines reasoning with punishment. Expecting immediate compliance, this style prioritizes obedience, respecting elders, honouring the family, emotional self-control, humility, and achievement. The fourth socialization style is the authoritative model of socialization. Social behaviours are clearly defined, respectfully and intentionally taught. Mistakes in behaviour are regarded as a necessary part of lifelong teaching and learning.

Environment processes and instructional factors associated with the authoritative style of teaching were translated into everyday social practices. Through this process, educators continued building their capacity for teaching and guiding young children's social behaviors. It is this paradigm and these tactics that are presented in this workshop.

Item ID: 45603
Item Type: Conference Item (Abstract / Summary)
Keywords: social learning; young children; Singapore; early years; environment; teaching
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Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2016 06:49
FoR Codes: 13 EDUCATION > 1301 Education Systems > 130102 Early Childhood Education (excl Maori) @ 60%
13 EDUCATION > 1303 Specialist Studies in Education > 130313 Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators @ 30%
13 EDUCATION > 1399 Other Education > 139999 Education not elsewhere classified @ 10%
SEO Codes: 93 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 9301 Learner and Learning > 930104 Moral and Social Development (incl. Affect) @ 55%
93 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 9302 Teaching and Instruction > 930202 Teacher and Instructor Development @ 30%
93 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 9304 School/Institution > 930402 School/Institution Community and Environment @ 15%
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