A comparison of the tissue oxygenation achieved using different oxygen delivery devices and flow rates

Blake, Denise F., Naidoo, Philip, Brown, Lawrence H., Young, Derelle, and Lippmann, John (2015) A comparison of the tissue oxygenation achieved using different oxygen delivery devices and flow rates. Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine, 45 (2). pp. 79-83.

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Abstract

Introduction: High-concentration normobaric oxygen (O2) administration is the first-aid priority in treating divers with suspected decompression illness. The best O2 delivery device and flow rate are yet to be determined.

Aim: To determine whether administering O2 with a non-rebreather mask (NRB) at a flow rate of 10 or 15 L∙min-1 or with a demand valve with oronasal mask significantly affects the tissue partial pressure of O2 (PtcO2) in healthy volunteer scuba divers.

Methods: Fifteen certified scuba divers had PtcO2 measured at six positions on the arm and leg. Measurements were taken with subjects lying supine whilst breathing O2 from a NRB at 10 or 15 L∙min-1, a demand valve with an adult Tru-Fit oronasal mask and, as a reference standard, an oxygen 'head hood'. End-tidal carbon dioxide was also measured.

Results: While none of the emergency delivery devices performed as well as the head hood, limb tissue oxygenation was greatest when O2 was delivered via the NRB at 15 L∙min-1. There were no clinically significant differences in end-tidal carbon dioxide regardless of the delivery device or flow rate.

Conclusion: Based on transcutaneous oximetry values, of the commonly available emergency O2 delivery devices, the NRB at 15 L∙min-1 is the device and flow rate that deliver the most O2 to body tissues and, therefore, should be considered as a first-line pre-hospital treatment in divers with suspected decompression illness.

Item ID: 39457
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: scuba diving; decompression illness; first aid; oxygen; equipment; transcutaneous oximetry; medical kits; DAN (Divers Alert Network)
ISSN: 1833-3516
Funders: Divers Alert Network Asia Pacific
Date Deposited: 21 Jul 2015 03:10
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences > 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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