Prediction of phylogeographic endemism in an environmentally complex biome

Carnaval, Ana Carolina, Waltari, Eric, Rodrigues, Miguel T., Rosauer, Dan, VanDerWal, Jeremy, Damasceno, Roberta, Prates, Ivan, Strangas, Maria, Spanos, Zoe, Rivera, Danielle, Pie, Marcio R., Firkowski, Carina R., Bornschein, Marcos R., Ribeiro, Luiz F., and Moritz, Craig (2014) Prediction of phylogeographic endemism in an environmentally complex biome. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B, Biological Sciences, 281 (1792). pp. 1-8.

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Abstract

Phylogeographic endemism, the degree to which the history of recently evolved lineages is spatially restricted, reflects fundamental evolutionary processes such as cryptic divergence, adaptation and biological responses to environmental heterogeneity. Attempts to explain the extraordinary diversity of the tropics, which often includes deep phylogeographic structure, frequently invoke interactions of climate variability across space, time and topography. To evaluate historical versus contemporary drivers of phylogeographic endemism in a tropical system, we analyse the effects of current and past climatic variation on the genetic diversity of 25 vertebrates in the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest.We identify two divergent bioclimatic domains within the forest and high turnover around the Rio Doce. Independent modelling of these domains demonstrates that endemism patterns are subject to different climatic drivers. Past climate dynamics, specifically areas of relative stability, predict phylogeographic endemism in the north. Conversely, contemporary climatic heterogeneity better explains endemism in the south. These results accord with recent speleothem and fossil pollen studies, suggesting that climatic variability through the last 250 kyr impacted the northern and the southern forests differently. Incorporating sub-regional differences in climate dynamics will enhance our ability to understand those processes shaping high phylogeographic and species endemism, in the Neotropicsand beyond.

Item ID: 38569
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1471-2954
Keywords: phylogeographic endemism; climate; forest refugia; biodiversity prediction; Atlantic Forest
Funders: NESCent Montane Biodiversity Working Group, CAPES-Fullbright, FAPESP, National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA
Projects and Grants: CAPES BEX-2740/06-0, CAPES FAPESP 213/22477-3, FAPESP IOTA, 2013/50297-0, NSF DEB 134357, NASA Dimensions of Biodiversity
Date Deposited: 28 Apr 2015 04:12
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity @ 40%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0603 Evolutionary Biology > 060306 Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change @ 30%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0501 Ecological Applications > 050101 Ecological Impacts of Climate Change @ 30%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960805 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity at Regional or Larger Scales @ 100%
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