Effects of temperature and salinity on the life cycle of Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea: Capsalidae) infecting farmed barramundi (Lates calcarifer )

Brazenor, Alexander K., and Hutson, Kate S. (2015) Effects of temperature and salinity on the life cycle of Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea: Capsalidae) infecting farmed barramundi (Lates calcarifer ). Parasitology Research, 114 (5). pp. 1875-1886.

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Abstract

Effective parasite management can be achieved through strategically timed treatments that break the life cycle. We examined the effects of temperature (2 °C increments from 22 to 34 °C) and salinity (0, 11, 22, 35, 40 ‰) on the life cycle (embryonation period, hatching success, oncomiracidia (larvae) longevity, infection success, and time to sexual maturity) of Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea: Capsalidae), a harmful ectoparasite of farmed marine fishes. Experiments were conducted in controlled conditions in the laboratory. The life cycle was faster in warm, high saline conditions compared to cooler conditions (10–13 days between 26–32 °C, 40 ‰; 15–16 days between 22–24 °C at 40 ‰). Warm seawater and high saline conditions (24–32 °C, 35–40 ‰) improved egg hatching success, reduced time to sexual maturity, and resulted in parasites reaching sexual maturity at a larger size (at 30–32 °C) compared to cooler conditions (22 °C). In contrast, cool, hypersaline conditions (22 °C, 40 ‰) increased oncomiracidia longevity and infection success. Linear and quantile regression models were used to construct an interactive, online parasite management interface to enable strategic treatment of parasites in aquaculture corresponding to observed temperature and salinity variation on farms in the tropics. It was recommended that farmers treat their stock more frequently during summer (27–31 °C) when parasites can complete their life cycle more quickly. Nevertheless, farmers should be aware of the potential for increased Neobenedenia sp. infections during winter months (21–26 °C) due to increased infection success.

Item ID: 37697
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: Aquaculture; treatment; Asian sea bass; Monogenea; Neobenedenia; egg hatching
Additional Information:

A version of this publication was included as Chapter 4 of the following PhD thesis: Brazenor, Alexander Karlis (2017) The biology of the cosmopolitan fish parasite Neobenedenia girellae. PhD thesis, James Cook University, which is available Open Access in ResearchOnline@JCU. Please see the Related URLs for access.

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ISSN: 1432-1955
Funders: James Cook University, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF), Fisheries Research and Development Corporation/Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (FRDC-DCEE)
Projects and Grants: NCCARF Project no. NATCLI97, FRDC-DCEE Project no. 2010/521
Date Deposited: 05 Jun 2015 02:48
FoR Codes: 07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0704 Fisheries Sciences > 070404 Fish Pests and Diseases @ 60%
07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0704 Fisheries Sciences > 070401 Aquaculture @ 40%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960407 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Marine Environments @ 40%
96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960402 Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Coastal and Estuarine Environments @ 40%
83 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 8301 Fisheries - Aquaculture > 830102 Aquaculture Fin Fish (excl. Tuna) @ 20%
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