A Day in a Life

Salisbury, David (2012) A Day in a Life.

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Abstract

10 quintets for wind instruments:

No. 1: Rise and Shine (7 – 8am). The use of 'rise and shine' as a wake up call for soldiers is what has given us the expression in everyday use. In that context 'rise' just means 'rouse yourself' and 'shine' derives from the shining of boots that soldiers were expected to do each morning.

No. 2: Fits and Starts (8 – 9am). The daily commute (or Stop and Starts). One of the many meanings of 'fit' is a paroxysm, or sudden and temporary seizure. The meaning of 'fit' when 'fits and starts' was coined, in the 17th century, was an earlier but milder version of that. It was then used to mean 'a sudden state of activity (or inactivity) or state of mind'. The phrase 'fits and starts' is somewhat tautological, as both allude to sporadic activity.

No. 3: The Long Haul (9 – 10am). A mountain of work. This usage dates from the late 1800s, as does the antonym, short haul, as in "The movers charge just as much for a short haul as for a long one". 
A considerable length of time, an extended period, as in "This investment is one for the long haul".

No. 4: The Lull Before the Storm (10 – 11am). Before the days activities really kick in. As an idiom, the 'calm before the storm' is often used interchangeably with similar phrases that replace the word 'calm' with 'quiet' or 'lull.' Regardless of the exact word choice, however, the meaning is the same. Instead, the 'calm before the storm' typically refers to a symbolic calm or storm, such as the time when a parent is relaxing prior to his or her children coming home from school.

No. 5: Hit The Ground Running (11 – 12pm). An early citation of it is found in a whimsical story which was syndicated in several newspapers, including The Evening News, 23rd April 1895, in a piece headed 'King Of All The Liars': "I turned to run and figured to a dot when he shot …. The bullet went under me. I knew he had five more cartridges, so I hit the ground running and squatted low down when his gun barked a second time."

No. 6: Half Full Half Empty (12 – 1pm) is a common expression, used rhetorically to indicate that a particular situation could be a cause for optimism (half full) or pessimism (half empty); or as a general litmus test to simply determine an individual's worldview. The purpose of the question is to demonstrate that the situation may be seen in different ways depending on one's point of view and that there may be opportunity in the situation as well as trouble.

No. 7: Another Day Another Dollar (1 – 2pm). "Another day, another dollar" is a recognition of a tough daily slog; "just another day," and the salary isn't very good. The saying dates to at least 1907 and was popular with soldiers in World War I (1918). A familiar ending was "Another day, another dollar; a million days, a million dollars" or "Another day, another dollar; a million days, a millionaire" —meaning that it's another tough day at work without ever accumulating into riches.

No. 8: From Here To Eternity (2- 3pm). Inspired by a line from Rudyard Kipling's poem "Gentleman Rankers". Gentlemen-rankers out on a spree, Damned from here to Eternity, God ha' mercy on such as we, Baa! Yah! Bah! To come; expected approaching, booked, close at hand, coming, coming up, destined, down the line, down the pike, down the road, eventual, fated, final, forthcoming, from here in, from here on, from here to eternity.

No. 9: In The Nick Of Time (3 – 4pm). It may not be immediately obvious what the nick of time is, but we do know what it means to be arriving at the last propitious moment. Prior to the 16th century there was another expression used to convey that meaning - 'pudding time'. This relates to the fact that pudding was the dish served first at mediaeval mealtimes. To arrive at pudding time was to arrive at the start of the meal, just in time to eat.

No. 10: Tit For Tat (4 – 5pm). It's tempting to assume that this phrase is another way of saying 'this for that', in a way, it is. 'Tit' and 'tat' are both the names of small blows which originated as 'tip' and 'tap'. Most recently, 'tit for tat' has been used as the name of the strategy in the game theory, the Prisoner's Dilemma. This strategy, recommends a like for like retaliation as the most rewarding response to duplicity by one's opponent.

Research Statement

Research Background Contemporary jazz composer George Russell postulates that all music is based on the tonal gravity of the Lydian mode. This research investigates Russell’s Lydian Chromatic theories through the composition of a woodwind quintet series that applies this modern jazz compositional approach to a classical woodwind quintet repertoire. It questions how an instrumental combination and form established in the early 1800s (Suppan, 2015), which was further popularised through organisations such as the Societé de musique de chambre pour instruments in the nineteenth century (Jacobs, 2015), might respond to this contemporary approach.
Research Contribution A Day in a Life extends the repertoire for a woodwind quintet with a series of ten jazz compositions utilising Russell’s Lydian Chromatic approach. Employing a modern harmonic approach, the compositions emphasise Quartal and Quintal harmonic structures in a deliberate effort to de-emphasise diatonic harmonic conventions. Further, the compositional approach uses a series of time signatures that create unusual metric phrasing, particularly the use of 5/4, 7/4, 8/4, 9/8 and 10/4. Colloquial expressions used as titles of the composition indicate mood, intent and time of day.
Research Significance A survey of musical repertoires for the woodwind quintet confirms that several of the time signatures, harmonic and theoretical approaches used in this series have not previously been explored in this way, hence this series represents a significant advancement of the repertoire for the woodwind quintet. Positive responses from two professional and internationally-renowned quintets (Galliards and Ventos) confirm the transferability, playability and fluid nature of musical idioms between established genres and forms, in this case jazz and classical. Paul Hoffmann confirms a common musical language between classical and jazz forms but that jazz adds improvisation and a swing beat (Hoffmann 1996).
Item ID: 36977
Item Type: Composition (Chamber Music)
Media of Output: Digital recording
Keywords: Woodwinds, quintet, composition
Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2015 01:07
FoR Codes: 19 STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING > 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing > 190406 Music Composition @ 100%
SEO Codes: 95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9501 Arts and Leisure > 950101 Music @ 100%
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