Ethnic differences in the cost-effectiveness of targeted and mass screening for high cardiovascular risk in the UK: cross-sectional study

Baker, Jessica, Mitchell, Richard, Lawson, Kenny, and Pell, Jill (2013) Ethnic differences in the cost-effectiveness of targeted and mass screening for high cardiovascular risk in the UK: cross-sectional study. Heart, 99 (23). pp. 1766-1771.

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Abstract

Objectives: To investigate ethnic differences in the cost-effectiveness of targeted and mass screening for high cardiovascular risk.

Design: Simulation of two screening strategies (targeted screening of most deprived areas and mass screening) using cross-sectional data from Health Survey for England.

Setting: England.

Subjects: 9407 adults aged 40–74 years (493 Black Caribbean, 532 Indian, 516 Pakistani/Bangladeshi, 617 Irish and 7249 general population of whom 6633 were White).

Main outcome measures: Coverage of high-risk population, number needed to screen to identify one person at high cardiovascular risk and cost-effectiveness of targeted screening, with incremental analysis of expanding targeted to mass screening.

Results: Coverage, number needed to screen and cost-effectiveness of targeted screening were better in all ethnic minority groups compared with the White group and general population. Targeted screening would identify 19.2% of high-risk individuals in the general population, and require 4.1 people to be screened to identify one person at high cardiovascular risk at a cost of £98. In the Pakistani/Bangladeshi group, 68.7% of the high-risk population would be identified, and only 2.5 people would need to be screened at a lower cost of £59. In comparison with targeted screening, mass screening was less cost-effective overall but the cost per additional high-risk individual detected was the lowest among the South Asian groups (Indian £130 and Pakistani/Bangladeshi £94).

Conclusions: Irrespective of whether cardiovascular screening is targeted or universal, it is more cost-effective in South Asian ethnic groups than in the general population. Therefore, cardiovascular screening has the potential to reduce ethnic health inequalities.

Item ID: 36975
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1468-201X
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2015 01:36
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology > 110201 Cardiology (incl Cardiovascular Diseases) @ 50%
14 ECONOMICS > 1402 Applied Economics > 140208 Health Economics @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920206 Health Policy Economic Outcomes @ 34%
92 HEALTH > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920207 Health Policy Evaluation @ 33%
92 HEALTH > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920208 Health Inequalities @ 33%
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