Promising Indigenous Fish Species and Bioremediation for Barramundi Aquaculture in Northern Australia

Graham, Peter, Nash, Warwick, Vira, Havini, and Zeng, Chaoshu (2012) Promising Indigenous Fish Species and Bioremediation for Barramundi Aquaculture in Northern Australia. Report. Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), Canberrra, ACT.

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Abstract

This project was a continuation of the ACIAR-funded scoping study Development of capacity for aquaculture of indigenous fish species in Papua New Guinea. The project aim was to assist inland aquaculture development in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Australia in an environmentally and cultural sensitive manner. Aquaculture has been identified for its potential to provide dietary protein for PNG people. The PNG National Fisheries Authority (NFA) in conjunction with the PNG project partners, Ok Tedi Mining Limited (OTML) and the Western Province government, identified the potential of native fish species for aquaculture. Developing farming systems built on herbivorous fish to negate the need for expensive feeds, and avoiding exotic species that may cause deleterious ecosystem impacts, were the aims of this research. Native fish species are a favoured food of inland people in the Western Province / Ok Tedi region because of their cultural significance (Smith 2000). As there are 35 species of freshwater fish common to northern Queensland and the PNG Western Province, the knowledge and experience in the biology and culture of these species among staff of the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries (DPI&F)¹ could be transferred to PNG.

Water availability and quality of the discharge water required to meet environmental standards are limiting factors to aquaculture development. Recycling of water through aquatic plants back to fish ponds can reduce the volume of water required to operate, and remove the nutrients prior to discharge to natural waterways. Water re-use will allow legislative compliance and can lead to greater profitability. Although barramundi were used as the culture species in the trials, the culture systems used would allow other species to be cultured. The aquatic plants used are common to PNG and Australia, allowing the technology to be transferred to other culture species in both countries.

Item ID: 28571
Item Type: Report (Report)
ISBN: 978-1-921962-87-5
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Report freely available from publisher website.

Funders: Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)
Projects and Grants: Promising indigenous fish species and bioremediation for barramundi aquaculture in northern Australia
Date Deposited: 29 Aug 2013 23:54
FoR Codes: 07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0704 Fisheries Sciences > 070401 Aquaculture @ 100%
SEO Codes: 83 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 8301 Fisheries - Aquaculture > 830101 Aquaculture Crustaceans (excl. Rock Lobster and Prawns) @ 30%
83 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 8301 Fisheries - Aquaculture > 830102 Aquaculture Fin Fish (excl. Tuna) @ 70%
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