Mating success of resident versus non-resident males in a territorial butterfly

Bergman, Martin, Gotthard, Karl, Berger, David, Olofsson, Martin, Kemp, Darrell J., and Wiklund, Christer (2007) Mating success of resident versus non-resident males in a territorial butterfly. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B, Biological Sciences, 274 (1618). pp. 1659-1665.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Published Version)
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (248kB)
View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2007.0311
 
43
39


Abstract

Male–male competition over territorial ownership suggests that winning is associated with considerable benefits. In the speckled wood butterfly, Pararge aegeria, males fight over sunspot territories on the forest floor; winners gain sole residency of a sunspot, whereas losers patrol the forest in search of females. It is currently not known whether residents experience greater mating success than non-residents, or whether mating success is contingent on environmental conditions. Here we performed an experiment in which virgin females of P. aegeria were allowed to choose between a resident and a non-resident male in a large enclosure containing one territorial sunspot. Resident males achieved approximately twice as many matings as non-residents, primarily because matings were most often preceded by a female being discovered when flying through a sunspot. There was no evidence that territorial residents were more attractive per se, with females seen to reject them as often as non-residents. Furthermore, in the cases where females were discovered outside of the sunspot, they were just as likely to mate with non-residents as residents. We hypothesize that the proximate advantage of territory ownership is that light conditions in a large sunspot greatly increase the male's ability to detect and intercept passing receptive females.

Item ID: 2807
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1471-2954
Keywords: territorial butterfly; non resident males; resident males; Lepidoptera; contest success; mate locating behaviour; female choice; mate choice; butterfly vision
Additional Information:

This article has been made available under a CC-BY 4.0 licence

Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2009 01:55
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0604 Genetics > 060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 39
Last 12 Months: 22
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page