Touch

Salisbury, David, and Griswold, Erik (2010) Touch.

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Abstract

[Extract] This performance features David Salisbury (sax and flute), and Erik Griswold (piano and melodica); Movement by Rebecca Forde and Bernadette Ashley who will move, dance and use one another for resistance as they draw with their feet on a 3m square of raw canvas with compressed charcoal.The dancers’ movement will be captured on canvas on the floor and projected; Visual artists Donna Maloney & Therese Duff will paint at easels; Gail Mabo will create a contemporary indigenous interpretation.

Research Statement

Research Background [Extract] See Hear Now Festival 2010, April 16 - 18 is three days of cutting-edge multi-arts improvisatory performances, artist talks and workshops, with guests from interstate, working together with local, professional and emerging artists. This is the fourth See Hear Now Festival presented in Townsville by the Music Centre North Qld under Artistic Director Dr Michael Whiticker.
Research Contribution [Extract] “Performance 13: Touch” featured David Salisbury (sax and flute), and Erik Griswold (piano and melodica); Movement by Rebecca Forde and Bernadette Ashley who will move, dance and use one another for resistance as they draw with their feet on a 3m square of raw canvas with compressed charcoal. The dancers’ movement will be captured on canvas on the floor and projected; Visual artists Donna Maloney & Therese Duff painted at easels; Gail Mabo will created an indigenous interpretation.
Research Significance This performance was based on spontaneous or free improvisation between the collaborators. Free improvisation or free music is improvised music without any rules beyond the logic or inclination of the musician(s) involved. The term can refer to both a technique (employed by any musician in any genre) and as a recognizable genre in its own right. Free improvisation, as a genre of music, developed in the U.S. and Europe in the mid to late 1960s, largely as an outgrowth of free jazz and modern classical music. The addition of visual artists, movement and projected imagery create a new dimension to this form. The improvisational aspect is in response to visual and aural stimulus.
Item ID: 19450
Item Type: Performance
Media of Output: CD ROM
Keywords: experimental art; free improvisation; music; visual arts; movement
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Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2011 06:09
FoR Codes: 19 STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING > 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing > 190407 Music Performance @ 100%
SEO Codes: 95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9501 Arts and Leisure > 950101 Music @ 100%
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