Risk and economic reciprocity: an analysis of three regional Aboriginal food-sharing systems in Holocene Australia

Tibbett, Kevin (2004) Risk and economic reciprocity: an analysis of three regional Aboriginal food-sharing systems in Holocene Australia. Australian Archaeology, 58. pp. 7-10.

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Abstract

This paper is a theoretical examination of food-sharing systems and archaeological theory. The specific aim is to assess the archaeological indicators of three different food-sharing systems, with the variable relationships between risk-management, social regionalisation, economic reciprocity and exchange. It is suggested that the Bogong moth (Agrotis infusa) festivities in the southern highlands of New South Wales, the Bunya nut (Araucaria bidwillii) gatherings in southeast Queensland and the seasonal food-sharing along the riverine corridors of the Lake Eyre Basin form a continuum between positive and negative reciprocity.

Item ID: 13842
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 0312-2417
Keywords: Australia; food-sharing systems; Holocene; risk
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2011 00:49
FoR Codes: 21 HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY > 2101 Archaeology > 210199 Archaeology not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9505 Understanding Past Societies > 950503 Understanding Australias Past @ 100%
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