Larval export from marine reserves and the recruitment benefit for fish and fisheries

Harrison, Hugo B., Williamson, David H., Evans, Richard D., Almany, Glenn R., Thorrold, Simon R., Russ, Garry R., Feldheim, Kevin A., van Herwerden, Lynne, Planes, Serge, Srinivasan, Maya, Berumen, Michael L., and Jones, Geoffrey P. (2012) Larval export from marine reserves and the recruitment benefit for fish and fisheries. Current Biology, 22 (11). pp. 1023-1028.

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Abstract

Marine reserves, areas closed to all forms of fishing, continue to be advocated and implemented to supplement fisheries and conserve populations [ [1], [2], [3] and [4]]. However, although the reproductive potential of important fishery species can dramatically increase inside reserves [ [5], [6], [7] and [8]], the extent to which larval offspring are exported and the relative contribution of reserves to recruitment in fished and protected populations are unknown [ [4], [9], [10] and [11]]. Using genetic parentage analyses, we resolve patterns of larval dispersal for two species of exploited coral reef fish within a network of marine reserves on the Great Barrier Reef. In a 1,000 km2 study area, populations resident in three reserves exported 83% (coral trout, Plectropomus maculatus) and 55% (stripey snapper, Lutjanus carponotatus) of assigned offspring to fished reefs, with the remainder having recruited to natal reserves or other reserves in the region. We estimate that reserves, which account for just 28% of the local reef area, produced approximately half of all juvenile recruitment to both reserve and fished reefs within 30 km. Our results provide compelling evidence that adequately protected reserve networks can make a significant contribution to the replenishment of populations on both reserve and fished reefs at a scale that benefits local stakeholders.

Item ID: 23386
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Additional Information:

All additional supporting information found at the following link has been combined into a single PDF: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2012.04.008

ISSN: 1879-0445
Date Deposited: 17 Sep 2012 05:25
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0604 Genetics > 060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics @ 20%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060207 Population Ecology @ 40%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050209 Natural Resource Management @ 40%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960502 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments @ 50%
96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity @ 50%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 2
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