A bridge to recovery: an interpretative phenomenological analysis with peer support specialists in Singapore

Ng, Jing Ting Lynn, and Barlas, Joanna (2023) A bridge to recovery: an interpretative phenomenological analysis with peer support specialists in Singapore. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being, 18 (1). 2164399.

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Abstract

Recovery-oriented mental health care approach is gaining acceptance in Asian countries, including Singapore. Following Western countries, Singapore started hiring peer support specialists (PSS) as part of mental healthcare services. The aim of this paper was to explore and understand how individual peer support specialists in Singapore perceive and make sense of their role given their unique perspective as both recipients and providers of mental healthcare treatment. Six PSS in Singapore were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview schedule. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four superordinate themes were generated illustrating how PSS viewed their role: embracing and embodying recovery, balancing on a bridge, impossible without support, and helping to end stigma. Findings also illustrated participants’ awareness of the nature of the job and the role of PSS as still in the infancy stage. They embraced a recovery-oriented mindset despite experiencing stigma from professionals and/or their social support. The need to understand familial attitudes towards the PSS role is discussed. The limitations, contributions to the research, and several areas for future research are also outlined.

Item ID: 77342
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1748-2631
Keywords: peer support specialist; recovery; interpretative phenomenological analysis; mental healthcare
Copyright Information: © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2023 01:10
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420313 Mental health services @ 100%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2003 Provision of health and support services > 200305 Mental health services @ 100%
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