Haycocknema perplexum myositis: The first description of subclinical disease and a proposed distinctive triad to evoke clinical suspicion

Ward, Kayla, Krishnan, Anirudh, Iyengar, Krishnan R., Robertson, Thomas, White, Richard, and Urkude, Ravindra (2022) Haycocknema perplexum myositis: The first description of subclinical disease and a proposed distinctive triad to evoke clinical suspicion. BMJ Neurology Open, 4 (1). e000290.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (722kB) | Preview
View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjno-2022-00029...
 
2
381


Abstract

Introduction: Haycocknema perplexum is an exceedingly rare cause of parasitic myositis endemic to Australia, more specifically, Tasmania and North Queensland. There is a paucity of literature regarding this diagnosis, with only nine previously described cases.

Diagnosis: This report details two cases of biopsy-confirmed H. perplexum myositis from Townsville University Hospital and describes the first-ever case of subclinical infection. There is limited known information regarding the H. perplexum life cycle and a definitive host which has hindered the development of a non-invasive diagnostic test. A review of the previously described cases has identified the hallmark features of this enigmatic condition: a triad of serological markers including deranged hepatic function, persistent eosinophilia and an elevated creatine kinase.

Conclusions: This report aimed to raise awareness of H. perplexum myositis and the possibility of subclinical infection, which suggests a protracted disease course. Further research is required to identify a non-invasive diagnostic test, given that early diagnosis and timely initiation of albendazole treatment may drastically limit patient disability.

Item ID: 76536
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2632-6140
Keywords: INFECTIOUS DISEASES, MUSCLE, NEUROMUSCULAR, NEUROPATHOLOGY, TROPICAL NEUROLOGY
Copyright Information: © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
Date Deposited: 26 Apr 2023 23:24
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3202 Clinical sciences > 320211 Infectious diseases @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 381
Last 12 Months: 14
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page