Women’s healthcare decision-making and unmet need for contraception in Mali

Ameyaw, Edward Kwabena, Seidu, Abdul-Aziz, and Ahinkorah, Bright Opoku (2022) Women’s healthcare decision-making and unmet need for contraception in Mali. Reproductive Health, 19. 183.

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Abstract

Background: Contraception plays a significant role in fertility regulation. Evidence suggests that reproductive health rights influence contraception use. Women of Mali are noted to have limited control over their healthcare decisions. As a result, this study aimed at investigating the association between women’s healthcare decision-making capacity and unmet need for contraception in Mali.

Methods: This study comprised 6593 women who participated in the 2018 Mali Demographic and Health Survey. Two binary logistic regression models were built. Whilst the first model (crude) involved healthcare decision-making capacity and unmet need for contraception, the second one was a complete model which controlled for all the socio-demographic characteristics. Sample weight was applied and Stata version 13.0 was used for all analyses.

Results: Most of the women were not taking their healthcare decisions alone (92.8%). Nearly four out of ten of them indicated that they had unmet need for contraception (35.7%). Unmet need for contraception was high among women aged 45–49 (50.9%) and low among those aged 15–19 (19.2%). Unmet need for contraception was more probable among women who took their healthcare decisions alone compared to those who did not take their healthcare decisions alone [AOR = 1.35; CI = 1.08–1.70]. Compared with women aged 15–19, unmet need was higher among women aged 45–49 [AOR = 4.58, CI = 3.05–6.86]. Richer women had lower odds of unmet need for contraception compared with poorest women [AOR = 0.77, CI = 0.61–0.97].

Conclusion: Women who took their healthcare decisions alone had higher odds of unmet need for contraception. To increase contraceptive use in Mali, it is imperative to take women’s healthcare decisions into consideration to strengthen existing policies geared towards fertility control and improvement in maternal health to achieve Sustainable Development Goals 3 and 5. Sustainable Development Goal 3 seeks to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages whilst Goal 5 aims at achieving gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Item ID: 76352
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1742-4755
Keywords: Contraception, Family planning, Mali, Reproductive health, Unmet need
Copyright Information: © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativeco mmons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Date Deposited: 16 Mar 2023 23:54
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420606 Social determinants of health @ 100%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200401 Behaviour and health @ 100%
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