"We are all migrant workers": commonality of Bangladeshi migrants' experiences in Singapore amidst Covid-19

Chattoraj, Diotima (2022) "We are all migrant workers": commonality of Bangladeshi migrants' experiences in Singapore amidst Covid-19. International Journal of Asia-Pacific Studies, 18 (2). pp. 9-36.

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Abstract

The number of COVID-19 infections in Singapore has increased dramatically since January 2020, with tens of thousands of cases linked to clusters in migrant workers' (MWs) dormitories. The government planned to isolate the dormitories, conduct COVID-19 tests regularly, and relocate symptomatic individuals into quarantine facilities in order to combat the spread. Despite this, the majority of them were locked in their dormitories, living in tight conditions where social distancing is a myth. This research explores how COVID-19 has impacted the lives of these workers in several ways and illustrates the experiences these migrants have during the pandemic. The emphasis is on low-skilled workers from Bangladesh, who are vulnerable to COVID-19 in a variety of ways. This study used the theory of commonality to explain the diverse experiences of Singapore employees. The data demonstrate the shared hardships of commonality they accepted during COVID-19. Apart from their families, they face a life of uncertainty and anguish in the dorms, stating that commonality is felt and embodied individually while collectively negotiated and enacted. Despite the fact that their lives are filled with uncertainty and worry, they are happy and comfortable in Singapore because of how the government has taken care of them during times of crisis.

Item ID: 75897
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1823-6243
Keywords: COVID-19, Singapore, migrant workers, Bangladesh, commonality
Copyright Information: © Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, 2022. This work is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2022 09:11
FoR Codes: 44 HUMAN SOCIETY > 4410 Sociology > 441013 Sociology of migration, ethnicity and multiculturalism @ 100%
SEO Codes: 13 CULTURE AND SOCIETY > 1399 Other culture and society > 139999 Other culture and society not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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