Exploring the long-term colonisation and persistence of probiotic-prophylaxis species on the gut microbiome of preterm infants: a pilot study

Westaway, Jacob A.F., Huerlimann, Roger, Kandasamy, Yogavijayan, Miller, Catherine M., Norton, Robert, Watson, David, Infante-Villamil, Sandra, and Rudd, Donna (2022) Exploring the long-term colonisation and persistence of probiotic-prophylaxis species on the gut microbiome of preterm infants: a pilot study. European Journal of Pediatrics, 181 (9). pp. 3389-3400.

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Abstract

Preterm infants suffer from a higher incidence of acute diseases such as necrotising enterocolitis and sepsis. This risk can be mitigated through probiotic prophylaxis during admission. This reduction in risk is likely the result of acute modulation of the gut microbiome induced by probiotic species, which has been observed to occur up until discharge. We aimed to determine if this modulation, and the associated probiotic species, persisted beyond discharge. We conducted both a cross-sectional analysis (n= 18), at similar to 18 months of age, and a longitudinal analysis (n= 6), from admission to 18 months of the gut microbiome of preterm infants using both shotgun metagenomics and 16S rRNA profiling respectively. The 16S amplicon sequencing revealed that the microbial composition of the probiotic-supplemented infants changed dramatically over time, stabilising at discharge. However, species from the probiotic Infloran (R), as well as positive modulatory effects previously associated with supplementation, do not appear to persist beyond discharge and once prophylaxis has stopped. Conclusions: Although differences exist between supplemented and non-supplemented groups, the implications of these differences remain unclear. Additionally, despite a lack of long-term colonisation, the presence of probiotics during early neonatal life may still have modulatory effects on the microbiome assembly and immune system training.

Item ID: 75622
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 0340-6199
Keywords: Preterm infant, Neonatal, Microbiome, Probiotics, NICU & metagenomics
Copyright Information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2022 08:19
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3213 Paediatrics > 321302 Infant and child health @ 50%
32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3207 Medical microbiology > 320701 Medical bacteriology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200104 Prevention of human diseases and conditions @ 50%
20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200105 Treatment of human diseases and conditions @ 50%
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