Efficacy of at home monitoring of foot temperature for risk reduction of diabetes-related foot ulcer: A meta-analysis

Golledge, Jonathan, Fernando, Malindu E., Alahakoon, Chanika, Lazzarini, Peter A., Aan de Stegge, Wouter B., van Netten, Jaap J., and Bus, Sicco A. (2022) Efficacy of at home monitoring of foot temperature for risk reduction of diabetes-related foot ulcer: A meta-analysis. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 38 (6). e3549.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (733kB) | Preview
View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.3549
 
2
564


Abstract

Aims: To perform an updated systematic review of randomised controlled trials examining the efficacy of at-home foot temperature monitoring in reducing the risk of a diabetes-related foot ulcer (DFU).

Methods: Systematic review performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Risk-of-bias was assessed using version 2 of the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Meta-analyses were performed using random effect models. Leave-one-out sensitivity analyses and a sub-analysis excluding trials considered at high risk-of-bias assessed the consistency of the findings. The certainty of the evidence was assessed with GRADE.

Results: Five randomised controlled trials involving 772 participants meeting the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) risk category 2 or 3 were included. All trials reported instructing participants to measure skin temperature at-home at six or more sites on each foot using a hand-held infra-red thermometer at least daily and reduce ambulatory activity in response to hotspots (temperature differences >2.2°C on two consecutive days between similar locations in both feet). One, one, and three trials were considered at low, moderate and high risk-of-bias, respectively. Participants allocated to at-home foot temperature monitoring had a reduced risk of developing a DFU (relative risk 0.51, 95% CI 0.31–0.84) compared to controls. Sensitivity and sub-analyses suggested that the significance of this finding was consistent. The GRADE assessment suggested a low degree of certainty in the finding.

Conclusions: At-home daily foot temperature monitoring and reduction of ambulatory activity in response to hotspots reduce the risk of a DFU in moderate or high risk people with a low level of certainty.

Item ID: 75128
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1520-7560
Keywords: diabetic foot ulcers, secondary prevention, temperature monitoring
Copyright Information: © 2022 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC 1117061
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2022 08:17
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3201 Cardiovascular medicine and haematology > 320199 Cardiovascular medicine and haematology not elsewhere classified @ 40%
32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3201 Cardiovascular medicine and haematology > 320102 Haematology @ 30%
32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3202 Clinical sciences > 320208 Endocrinology @ 30%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200105 Treatment of human diseases and conditions @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 564
Last 12 Months: 56
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page