A Review of COVID-19 Modelling Strategies in Three Countries to Develop a Research Framework for Regional Areas

Rahman, Azizur, Kuddus, Md Abdul, Ip, Ryan H.L, and Bewong, Michael (2021) A Review of COVID-19 Modelling Strategies in Three Countries to Develop a Research Framework for Regional Areas. Viruses, 13 (11). 2185.

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Abstract

At the end of December 2019, an outbreak of COVID-19 occurred in Wuhan city, China. Modelling plays a crucial role in developing a strategy to prevent a disease outbreak from spreading around the globe. Models have contributed to the perspicacity of epidemiological variations between and within nations and the planning of desired control strategies. In this paper, a literature review was conducted to summarise knowledge about COVID-19 disease modelling in three countries-China, the UK and Australia-to develop a robust research framework for the regional areas that are urban and rural health districts of New South Wales, Australia. In different aspects of modelling, summarising disease and intervention strategies can help policymakers control the outbreak of COVID-19 and may motivate modelling disease-related research at a finer level of regional geospatial scales in the future.

Item ID: 72741
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1999-4915
Keywords: Keywords: COVID-19; NSW; different settings; intervention strategies; models.
Copyright Information: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Date Deposited: 10 May 2022 22:31
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420205 Epidemiological modelling @ 100%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2002 Evaluation of health and support services > 200205 Health policy evaluation @ 100%
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