Surgical services for breast cancer patients in Australia, is there a gap for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women?

De Jager, Elzerie, Gunnarsson, Ronny, and Ho, Yik-Hong (2022) Surgical services for breast cancer patients in Australia, is there a gap for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women? World Journal of Surgery, 46. pp. 612-621.

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Abstract

Background: Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women. When compared to other Australians, Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women have a higher breast cancer mortality rate. This systematic literature review examined disparities in breast cancer surgical access and outcomes for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women.

Methods: This systematic literature review, following the PRISMA guidelines, compared measures of breast cancer surgical care for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.

Results: The 13 included studies were largely state-based retrospective reviews of data collected prior to the year 2012. Eight studies reported more advanced breast cancer presentation among Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women. Despite the increased distance to a multidisciplinary, specialist team, there were no disparities in seeing a surgeon, or in the time from diagnosis to surgical treatment. Two studies reported disparities in the receipt of surgery and two reported no variations. Three studies reported disparities in the receipt of mastectomy versus breast conserving surgery, whilst four studies reported no variations. No studies examined postoperative surgical outcomes.

Conclusions: Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women present with more advanced breast cancer. There may be disparities in the receipt of surgery and the type of surgery. However, the metrics tested were not related to optimal care guidelines, and the databases utilised contain limited data on individual factors contributing to surgical care decisions. It is therefore difficult to determine whether the reported differences in the receipt of surgical care reflect disparate or appropriate care.

Item ID: 71359
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1432-2323
Copyright Information: © Societe Internationale de Chirurgie 2021
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2022 22:27
FoR Codes: 45 INDIGENOUS STUDIES > 4504 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing > 450409 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services @ 100%
SEO Codes: 21 INDIGENOUS > 2103 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health > 210302 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status and outcomes @ 100%
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