COVID-19 and the impact on the student delivery of exercise physiology services: a mixed method study.

McGuckin, Teneale, Simmons, Lisa, and Turner, Denise (2022) COVID-19 and the impact on the student delivery of exercise physiology services: a mixed method study. Australian Journal of Clinical Education, 9 (1). pp. 72-84.

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Abstract

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the face-to-face delivery of exercise with social distancing restrictions preventing close contact between client and exercise professional. Additionally, exercise physiology students have had to adapt to these changes and use telehealth to achieve their learning outcomes. This study aimed to explore client and student perspectives of their experience with face-to-face exercise delivery prior to COVID-19 restrictions and telehealth during restrictions.

Methods: Clients and students were invited to complete an online survey exploring their experience with student-led exercise services prior to COVID-19 restrictions and during restrictions. Likert-scale questions were compared using a Wilcoxon test and open-ended responses were thematically analysed.

Results: Prior to COVID-19 restrictions, all students (n = 7) reported that providing face-to-face exercise physiology services resulted in positive learning experiences and clients (n = 12) were satisfied with their experience. During the restrictions, the client satisfaction with exercise delivery via telehealth remained high, however, students’ learning experience was hindered by the restrictions.

Discussion and conclusion: For clients, satisfaction with the exercise delivery remained high and the convenience of telehealth were useful during a pandemic. For students, their exercise prescription and ability to assess and monitor their clients were impacted by using telehealth.

Item ID: 71124
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2207-4791
Keywords: COVID-19, pandemic, student learning, client satisfaction, exercise physiology, telehealth
Copyright Information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 Licence.
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2022 03:31
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420302 Digital health @ 50%
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420702 Exercise physiology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2002 Evaluation of health and support services > 200208 Telehealth @ 50%
20 HEALTH > 2003 Provision of health and support services > 200301 Allied health therapies (excl. mental health services) @ 50%
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