What was the impact of a participatory research project in Australian Indigenous primary healthcare services? Applying a comprehensive framework for assessing translational health research to Lessons for the Best

Ramanathan, Shanthi Ann, Larkins, Sarah, Carlisle, Karen, Turner, Nalita, Bailie, Ross Stewart, Thompson, Sandra, Bainbridge, Roxanne, Deeming, Simon, and Searles, Andrew (2021) What was the impact of a participatory research project in Australian Indigenous primary healthcare services? Applying a comprehensive framework for assessing translational health research to Lessons for the Best. BMJ Open, 11 (2). e040749.

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Abstract

Objectives To (1) apply the Framework to Assess the Impact from Translational health research (FAIT) to Lessons from the Best to Better the Rest (LFTB), (2) report on impacts from LFTB and (3) assess the feasibility and outcomes from a retrospective application of FAIT.

Setting Three Indigenous primary healthcare (PHC) centres in the Northern Territory, Australia; project coordinating centre distributed between Townsville, Darwin and Cairns and the broader LFTB learning community across Australia.

Participants LFTB research team and one representative from each PHC centre.

Primary and secondary outcome measures Impact reported as (1) quantitative metrics within domains of benefit using a modified Payback Framework, (2) a cost-consequence analysis given a return on investment was not appropriate and (3) a narrative incorporating qualitative evidence of impact. Data were gathered through in-depth stakeholder interviews and a review of project documentation, outputs and relevant websites.

Results LFTB contributed to knowledge advancement in Indigenous PHC service delivery; enhanced existing capacity of health centre staff, researchers and health service users; enhanced supportive networks for quality improvement; and used a strengths-based approach highly valued by health centres. LFTB also leveraged between $A1.4 and $A1.6 million for the subsequent Leveraging Effective Ambulatory Practice (LEAP) Project to apply LFTB learnings to resource development and creation of a learning community to empower striving PHC centres.

Conclusion Retrospective application of FAIT to LFTB, although not ideal, was feasible. Prospective application would have allowed Indigenous community perspectives to be included. Greater appreciation of the full benefit of LFTB including a measure of return on investment will be possible when LEAP is complete. Future assessments of impact need to account for the limitations of fully capturing impact when intermediate/final impacts have not yet been realised and captured

Item ID: 70893
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2044-6055
Keywords: capacity strengthening; continuous quality improvement; impact assessment; indigenous primary healthcare.
Copyright Information: © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY- NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)
Projects and Grants: NRMRC GNT ID 1078927, NHMRC GNT ID 1062377, NHMRC GNT ID 1148660
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2021 01:27
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420319 Primary health care @ 50%
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420321 Rural and remote health services @ 50%
SEO Codes: 21 INDIGENOUS > 2103 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health > 210303 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health system performance @ 100%
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