Relationship between requirement to stop during a six-minute walk test and health-related quality of life, physical activity and physical performance amongst people with intermittent claudication

Golledge, Jonathan, Yip, Lisan, Fernando, Malindu E., Pinchbeck, Jenna, Rowbotham, Sophie, Jenkins, Jason, and Leicht, Anthony (2021) Relationship between requirement to stop during a six-minute walk test and health-related quality of life, physical activity and physical performance amongst people with intermittent claudication. Annals of Vascular Surgery, 76. pp. 363-369.

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Abstract

Aim: A simple objective test is required to identify people with impaired physical aspects of health-related quality of life (QOL) due to intermittent claudication. This study assessed the relationship of QOL, function and physical activity to the need to stop during a six-minute walking test (6MWT) amongst people with intermittent claudication. Method: This was a prospective case-control study conducted at two centers in Australia. 173 participants with a history of intermittent claudication and peripheral artery disease diagnosed by ankle brachial pressure index <0.9, completed two 6MWTs one week apart. QOL was assessed with the short form (SF)-36. Physical activity was assessed by an accelerometer to record step count, stepping time and energy expenditure over 7 days. Physical performance was assessed by the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) test. The associations of the need to stop at least once during the 6MWT with QOL, function and activity were assessed using Mann Whitney U test and analysis of covariates. Results: Participants that had to stop at least once during the two 6MWTs (46; 26.6%) had significantly lower scores for three of the domains (physical functioning, role-physical and bodily pain) and the physical component summary (PCS) measure of the SF-36 compared to those who did not need to stop (n = 127; 73.4%). After adjusting for the risk factor co-variates (diabetes, hypertension and ankle brachial pressure index) which were significantly unequally distributed, needing to stop during the 6MWTs was significantly associated with a lower PCS score (adjusted mean 36.5, standard error 0.8 vs. 30.5, standard error 1.3; F = 14.0; P < 0.001; partial eta squared 0.077). Participants that had to stop at least once during the two 6MWTs had significantly lower 7-day step count, time stepping and energy expenditure, but not total SPPB score, compared to those who did not need to stop. Conclusions: Needing to stop during a 6MWT identified participants with intermittent claudication with poorer QOL and less physical activity compared to those that do not need to stop.

Item ID: 70707
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1615-5947
Copyright Information: © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Townsville Hospital and Health Service Private Practice Research and Education Trust Fund, Queensland Government (QG)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC practitioner fellowship 1117061, NHMRC Grant No. 1063476, QG Queensland Government Senior Clinical Research Fellowship
Date Deposited: 07 Feb 2022 01:40
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3201 Cardiovascular medicine and haematology > 320101 Cardiology (incl. cardiovascular diseases) @ 70%
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420702 Exercise physiology @ 30%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200407 Health status (incl. wellbeing) @ 50%
20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200199 Clinical health not elsewhere classified @ 50%
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