Tropical Australian health-data linkage shows excess mortality following severe infectious disease is present in the short-term and long-term after hospital discharge

Adegboye, Oyelola A., McBryde, Emma S., and Eisen, Damon P. (2021) Tropical Australian health-data linkage shows excess mortality following severe infectious disease is present in the short-term and long-term after hospital discharge. Healthcare, 9 (7). 901.

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Abstract

Background: In this study, we aimed to assess the risk factors associated with mortality due to an infectious disease over the short-, medium-, and long-term based on a data-linkage study for patients discharged from an infectious disease unit in North Queensland, Australia, between 2006 and 2011.

Methods: Age-sex standardised mortality rates (SMR) for different subgroups were estimated, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate and compare the survival experience among different groups.

Results: Overall, the mortality rate in the hospital cohort was higher than expected in comparison with the Queensland population (SMR: 15.3, 95%CI: 14.9–15.6). The long-term mortality risks were significantly higher for severe infectious diseases than non-infectious diseases for male sex, Indigenous, residential aged care and elderly individuals.

Conclusion: In general, male sex, Indigenous status, age and comorbidity were associated with an increased hazard for all-cause deaths

Item ID: 68723
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2227-9032
Keywords: sepsis; mortality; infectious disease; data-linkage; North Queensland
Copyright Information: © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Funders: Advance Queensland Research Fellowship
Date Deposited: 19 Jul 2021 22:59
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3202 Clinical sciences > 320211 Infectious diseases @ 60%
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified @ 40%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2002 Evaluation of health and support services > 200202 Evaluation of health outcomes @ 50%
20 HEALTH > 2002 Evaluation of health and support services > 200204 Health inequalities @ 50%
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