Hospitalisation for lower respiratory tract infection is associated with an increased incidence of acute myocardial infarction and stroke in tropical Northern Australia

Pak, A., Eisen, D.P., McBryde, E.S., and Adegboye, O.A. (2021) Hospitalisation for lower respiratory tract infection is associated with an increased incidence of acute myocardial infarction and stroke in tropical Northern Australia. Scientific Reports, 11. 6862.

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Abstract

Acute respiratory infections appear to precipitate vascular events. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke are the leading cause of death and disability globally. This study was based on a cohort of patients admitted to Townsville University Hospital between January 2006 and December 2016. Using a self-controlled case series design, we investigated the risk of AMI or ischaemic stroke after an episode of pneumonia. We defined the 'risk interval' as the first 14 days after hospitalisation for pneumonia and the 'control interval' as one year before and one year after the risk interval. Among a population (N = 4557) with a median age of over 70, a total of 128 AMI and 27 stroke cases were identified within 1 year of an episode of pneumonia in this study. Ten and two admissions occurred during the risk interval, while 118 and 25 admissions occurred during the control period. The relative incidence ratios (RIR) of AMI increased after an episode of pneumonia (RIR=4.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.44–9.67). The risk for stroke after the exposure period of 14 days was 4.94 (95% CI 1.12–21.78) considering only the first stroke incidence. The RIR results for AMI and stroke were not altered by adjusting for age, sex or Indigenous status. The risk of AMI and stroke were significantly higher two weeks after an episode of pneumonia.

Item ID: 67620
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2045-2322
Copyright Information: Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.© The Author(s) 2021.
Date Deposited: 14 Jun 2021 23:37
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3202 Clinical sciences > 320211 Infectious diseases @ 40%
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420699 Public health not elsewhere classified @ 30%
49 MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES > 4905 Statistics > 490501 Applied statistics @ 30%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200499 Public health (excl. specific population health) not elsewhere classified @ 50%
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200412 Preventive medicine @ 50%
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