Molecular identification of ray species traded along the Brazilian Amazon coast

Rodrigues Filho, Luis Fernando da Silva, Feitosa, Leonardo Manir, Silva Nunes, Jorge Luiz, Onodera Palmeira, Ana Rita, Martins, Ana Paula Barbosa, Giarrizzo, Tommaso, Carvalho-Costa, Luís Fernando, Monteiro, Iann Leonardo Pinheiro, Gemaque, Romário, Gomes, Fernanda, Souza, Rosália Furtado C., Sampaio, Iracilda, and Sales, João Bráullio de Luna (2020) Molecular identification of ray species traded along the Brazilian Amazon coast. Fisheries Research, 223. 105407.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fishres.2019.1...
7


Abstract

Overfishing can lead to stock collapses of both target and bycatch species. In some cases, unregulated fishing activities can even drive species towards extinction. Batoids comprise a significant portion of the bycatch of fisheries targeting teleost fishes. In Brazil, the Amazon coast is the second largest landing area in the country for these organisms. The present study aimed to identify batoid species captured and traded along the Brazilian Amazon coast, as well as to analyze the batoids species most commercialized in the region by using the cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 (COI) mitochondrial gene. In total, 118 samples were collected and nine species identified. Dasyatidae was the most abundant family (two genera, three species, and 52 individuals), followed by Aetobatidae (one genus and one species), Rhinopteridae (one genus, two species), and Narcinidae (one genus, one species), each with 14 individuals. Finally, Gymnuridae and Pristidae were represented by one genus, one species and 12 individuals each. Threatened species, such as Pristis pristis and Rhinoptera brasiliensis, were found to be commonly traded in the fish markets. Results also pointed the presence of a third and undescribed Narcine species. Finally, genetic differences between populations of the same species were found for Hypanus guttatus, Aetobatus narinari, and Rhinoptera bonasus - indicating possible geographic and/or reproductive separations. Therefore, we reinforce the need of forensics research to incorporate DNA-based evidence. This information could support improvements on management and law enforcement of batoid fisheries and trade in Brazil.

Item ID: 67242
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1872-6763
Keywords: Amazon fisheries, Batoidea, Conservation, DNA barcoding, Elasmobranchii
Copyright Information: © 2019 Elsevier B.V.
Funders: National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, Brazil (CNPq), Fundação de Amparo à Ciência e Tecnologia do Estado de Pernambuco (FACEPE), National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, Brazil (CNPq)
Projects and Grants: CNPq 474843/2013-0, FACEPE process IBPG-0089-2.05/17, CNPq grant 306041/2017-0
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2021 00:49
FoR Codes: 30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3005 Fisheries sciences > 300504 Fish physiology and genetics @ 50%
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3005 Fisheries sciences > 300505 Fisheries management @ 50%
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page