Intestinal microbiology shapes population health impacts of diet and lifestyle risk exposures in torres strait islander communities

Mobegi, Fredrick M., Leong, Lex E.X., Thompson, Fintan, Taylor, Sean M., Harriss, Linton R., Choo, Jocelyn M., Taylor, Steven L., Wesselingh, Steve L., McDermott, Robyn, Ivey, Kerry L., and Rogers, Geraint B. (2020) Intestinal microbiology shapes population health impacts of diet and lifestyle risk exposures in torres strait islander communities. eLife, 9. e58407.

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Abstract

Poor diet and lifestyle exposures are implicated in substantial global increases in non-communicable disease burden in low-income, remote, and Indigenous communities. This observational study investigated the contribution of the fecal microbiome to influence host physiology in two Indigenous communities in the Torres Strait Islands: Mer, a remote island where a traditional diet predominates, and Waiben a more accessible island with greater access to takeaway food and alcohol. Counterintuitively, disease markers were more pronounced in Mer residents. However, island-specific differences in disease risk were explained, in part, by microbiome traits. The absence of Alistipes onderdonkii, for example, significantly (p=0.014) moderated island-specific patterns of systolic blood pressure in multivariate-adjusted models. We also report mediatory relationships between traits of the fecal metagenome, disease markers, and risk exposures. Understanding how intestinal microbiome traits influence response to disease risk exposures is critical for the development of strategies that mitigate the growing burden of cardiometabolic disease in these communities.

Item ID: 66695
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2050-084X
Keywords: Adult; Aged; Diet; Female; Gastrointestinal Microbiome; Humans; Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Oceanic Ancestry Group; Population Health; Young Adult
Copyright Information: © 2020, Mobegi et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Flinders University (FU)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC grant GNT0631947, NHMRC fellowship, FU Matthew Flinders Research Fellowship, NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship
Date Deposited: 13 May 2021 03:40
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420299 Epidemiology not elsewhere classified @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 40
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