Elevated temperature and CO₂ have positive effects on the growth and survival of larval Australasian snapper

McMahon, Shannon, Parsons, Darren M., Donelson, Jennifer, Pether, Steve M. J., and Munday, Philip L. (2020) Elevated temperature and CO₂ have positive effects on the growth and survival of larval Australasian snapper. Marine Environmental Research, 161. 105054.

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Abstract

Rising water temperature and increased uptake of CO2 by the ocean are predicted to have widespread impacts on marine species. However, the effects are likely to vary, depending on a species’ sensitivity and the geographical location of the population. Here, we investigated the potential effects of elevated temperature and pCO2 on larval growth and survival in a New Zealand population of the Australasian snapper, Chrysophyrs auratus. Eggs and larvae were reared in a fully cross-factored experiment (18 °C and 22 °C/pCO2 440 and 1040 μatm) to 16 days post hatch (dph). Morphologies at 1 dph and 16 dph were significantly affected by temperature, but not CO2. At 1dph, larvae at 22 °C were longer (7%) and had larger muscle depth at vent (14%), but had reduced yolk (65%) and oil globule size (16%). Reduced yolk reserves in recently hatched larvae suggests higher metabolic demands in warmer water. At 16 dph, larvae at elevated temperature were longer (12%) and muscle depth at vent was larger (64%). Conversely, survival was primarily affected by CO2 rather than temperature. Survivorship at 1 dph and 16 dph was 24% and 54% higher, respectively, under elevated CO2 compared with ambient conditions. Elevated temperature increased survival (24%) at 1 dph, but not at 16 dph. These results suggest that projected climate change scenarios may have an overall positive effect on early life history growth and survival in this population of C. auratus. This could benefit recruitment success, but needs to be weighed against negative effects of elevated CO2 on metabolic rates and swimming performance observed in other studies on the same population.

Item ID: 66692
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1879-0291
Copyright Information: © 2020 Elsevier Ltd.
Funders: Ministry of Primary Industries, New Zealand, Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment, NZ, Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CE)
Research Data: https://doi.org/10.25903/5f17c71f11e4c
Date Deposited: 27 Apr 2021 05:48
FoR Codes: 31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3104 Evolutionary biology > 310405 Evolutionary ecology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 19 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, CLIMATE CHANGE AND NATURAL HAZARDS > 1901 Adaptation to climate change > 190102 Ecosystem adaptation to climate change @ 100%
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