Making a case for using γδ T cells against SARS-CoV-2

Yazdanifar, Mahboubeh, Mashkour, Narges, and Bertaina, Alice (2020) Making a case for using γδ T cells against SARS-CoV-2. Critical Reviews in Microbiology, 46 (6). pp. 689-702.

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Abstract

Intensive worldwide efforts are underway to determine both the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the immune responses in COVID-19 patients in order to develop effective therapeutics and vaccines. One type of cell that may contribute to these immune responses is the γδ T lymphocyte, which plays a key role in immunosurveillance of the mucosal and epithelial barriers by rapidly responding to pathogens. Although found in low numbers in blood, γδ T cells consist the majority of tissue-resident T cells and participate in the front line of the host immune defense. Previous studies have demonstrated the critical protective role of γδ T cells in immune responses to other respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-1. However, no studies have profoundly investigated these cells in COVID-19 patients to date. γδ T cells can be safely expanded in vivo using existing inexpensive FDA-approved drugs such as bisphosphonate, in order to test its protective immune response to SARS-CoV-2. To support this line of research, we review insights gained from previous coronavirus research, along with recent findings, discussing the potential role of γδ T cells in controlling SARS-CoV-2. We conclude by proposing several strategies to enhance γδ T cell’s antiviral function, which may be used in developing therapies for COVID-19.

Item ID: 66647
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1549-7828
Keywords: coronavirus, COVID-19, immune response, SARS-CoV-2, γδ T cell
Copyright Information: © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Funders: Lorry Lokey Faculty Scholar
Date Deposited: 24 May 2021 22:58
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3202 Clinical sciences > 320203 Clinical microbiology @ 100%
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