Simulated future conditions of ocean warming and acidification disrupt the microbiome of the calcifying foraminifera Marginopora vertebralis across life stages

Botté, E.S., Luter, H.M., Marangon, E., Patel, F., Uthicke, S., and Webster, N.S. (2020) Simulated future conditions of ocean warming and acidification disrupt the microbiome of the calcifying foraminifera Marginopora vertebralis across life stages. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 12 (6). pp. 693-701.

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Abstract

Foraminifera host diverse microbial communities that can shift in response to changing environmental conditions. To characterize climate change impacts on the foraminifera microbiome across life stages, we exposed adult Marginopora vertebralis (Large Benthic Foraminifera) to pCO2 and temperature scenarios representing present-day, 2050 and 2100 levels and raised juveniles under present-day and 2050 conditions. While treatment condition had no significant effect on the seawater microbial communities, exposure to future scenarios significantly altered both adult and juvenile microbiomes. In adults, divergence between present-day and 2050 or 2100 conditions was primarily driven by a reduced relative abundance of Oxyphotobacteria under elevated temperature and pCO2. In juveniles, the microbial shift predominantly resulted from changes in the proportion of Proteobacteria. Indicator species analysis identified numerous treatment-specific indicator taxa, most of which were indicative of present-day conditions. Oxyphotobacteria, previously reported as putative symbionts of foraminifera, were indicative of present-day and 2050 conditions in adults, but of present-day conditions only in juveniles. Overall, we show that the sensitivity of the M. vertebralis microbiome to climate change scenarios extends to both life stages and primarily correlates with declines in Oxyphotobacteria and shifts in Proteobacteria under elevated temperature and pCO2.

Item ID: 66597
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1758-2229
Copyright Information: © 2020 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Funders: Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS)
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2021 06:17
FoR Codes: 41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4101 Climate change impacts and adaptation > 410102 Ecological impacts of climate change and ecological adaptation @ 50%
31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3107 Microbiology > 310703 Microbial ecology @ 50%
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