The impact of excess alcohol consumption on health care utilisation in regional patients with chronic disease – a retrospective chart audit

Mudd, Julie, Larkins, Sarah, and Watt, Kerrianne (2020) The impact of excess alcohol consumption on health care utilisation in regional patients with chronic disease – a retrospective chart audit. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 44 (6). pp. 457-461.

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Abstract

Objective: To understand the impact of alcohol consumption on the health utilisation of people with chronic diseases. Methods: A retrospective chart audit was undertaken in two primary care settings in a regional Australian city. Three indicator conditions were selected: type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease. The audits were analysed to examine the impact of alcohol consumption on primary care and hospital-based health utilisation. Results: A total of 457 records were audited. Alcohol consumption decreased engagement in the primary care setting, with fewer visits, prescriptions and lower primary care costs. There was a U-shaped association between alcohol consumption and hospital attendance rates and costs. Admission rates were unchanged but a decrease in length of stay was observed in nonsmokers in the highest alcohol consumption category. Conclusion: Excess alcohol consumption decreases engagement in primary care and results in increased emergency department attendance, but not admissions to hospital. In those who are admitted to hospital, alcohol is associated with a decreased length of stay. Implications for public health: Alcohol consumption should be considered as a potential cause of decreased engagement in primary care. Follow-up and recall of patients may reduce shifting of care to the hospital environment.

Item ID: 66241
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1753-6405
Copyright Information: © 2020. This work is published underhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/(the “License”). Notwithstanding the ProQuest Terms and Conditions, you may use thiscontent in accordance with the terms of the License.
Date Deposited: 23 Feb 2021 00:06
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420319 Primary health care @ 100%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200413 Substance abuse @ 50%
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200407 Health status (incl. wellbeing) @ 50%
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