Specific pathogen-free animals for civilian and military trauma: a cautionary note in the translation of new drug therapies

Dobson, Geoffrey P., Morris, Jodie L., Biros, Erik, and Letson, Hayley L. (2020) Specific pathogen-free animals for civilian and military trauma: a cautionary note in the translation of new drug therapies. Shock, 54 (2). pp. 232-236.

[img] PDF (Accepted Publisher Version) - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.000000000000...
 
2
6


Abstract

Specific-pathogen free (SPF) animals were introduced into biomedical research in the early 1960s to reduce the incidence of disease into experimental design. The goal was to provide animals with selected microbiota compatible with sustained health. Sixty years later, SPF status has become a variable itself in biomedical research. Alterations in the gut microbiome–host relationship can profoundly influence basic physiology, immune/inflammatory function, susceptibility to infection and disease, and behavior. In addition, it can influence the translational success of a drug or technology from animal models to humans. We discuss this aspect of SPF status in animal models used for military or civilian trauma and shock research. Currently, there is a broad spectrum of SPF exclusion and inclusion criteria which vary from one supplier or animal husbandry facility. If translation to humans is the end-game of trauma research, we recommend replicating a gut microbiome similar to the wild-type for optimal success. We further suggest that at the end of each publication a URL access be provided on Animal Microbial/Pathogen Exclusion Status that a study was based upon. This may help address the differences in results within a single laboratory or between laboratories around the world and improve translation success.

Item ID: 66008
Item Type: Article (Commentary)
ISSN: 1540-0514
Copyright Information: (C) 2019 by the Shock Society
Date Deposited: 22 Apr 2021 03:11
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3208 Medical physiology > 320803 Systems physiology @ 50%
32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3299 Other biomedical and clinical sciences > 329999 Other biomedical and clinical sciences not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 20 HEALTH > 2001 Clinical health > 200105 Treatment of human diseases and conditions @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 6
Last 12 Months: 6
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page