Health literacy environment of breast and cervical cancer among black African women globally: a systematic review protocol of mixed methods

Mwanri, Lillian, Gesesew, Hailay, Lee, Vanessa, Hiruy, Kiros, Udah, Hyacinth, Kwedza, Ru, and Dune, Tinashe (2020) Health literacy environment of breast and cervical cancer among black African women globally: a systematic review protocol of mixed methods. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (9). 3158.

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Abstract

Adequate health literacy is a necessity to enable effective decision making to seek, access and utilise appropriate health care service. Evidence exists indicating a low level of general health literacy among Black African women, especially those with a refugee background. Breast and cervical are the most common cancers, with Black African women or women with African ethnicity being disproportionately overrepresented. The level of health literacy specific to breast and cervical cancer among Black African women, especially those with a refugee background, has not been reviewed systematically. The present study describes a protocol for a systematic review of the available evidence on the level of health literacy specific to breast and cervical cancer among Black African women globally. We will perform a systematic review of the available quantitative and qualitative studies. The search will include studies that describe the level of health literacy specific to breast and cervical cancer among Black African women. We will conduct a preliminary search on Google scholar to build the concepts for search terms, and a full search strategy using the identified concepts and keywords across four databases namely PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL and Web of Sciences. We will use Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) to schematically present the search strategy. We will use the standardized Joanna Briggs Institute quality appraisal and selection tool to recruit studies, and the data extraction tool to synthesise the information extracted from the recruited studies. We will be guided by socioecological theory and Indigenous epistemology to synthesise the non-quantifiable information thematically, and pool the quantitative information using meta-analysis, based on the availability of information.

Item ID: 65744
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1660-4601
Keywords: Black African women; Health literacy; Breast cancer; Cervical cancer; Refugees; Protocol; Mixed methods
Copyright Information: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Date Deposited: 12 Feb 2021 04:48
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4206 Public health > 420603 Health promotion @ 50%
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420305 Health and community services @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being) @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 50%
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