Camera traps are an effective method for identifying individuals and determining the sex of spotted-tailed quolls (Dasyurus maculatus gracilis)

Rowland, Jesse, Hoskin, Conrad J., and Burnett, Scott (2020) Camera traps are an effective method for identifying individuals and determining the sex of spotted-tailed quolls (Dasyurus maculatus gracilis). Australian Mammalogy, 42 (3). pp. 349-356.

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Abstract

We compared two bait station techniques for determining the sex and identifying individual spotted-tailed quolls (Dasyurus maculatus gracilis) using images taken by camera traps. One method used bait in a plastic mesh bag and the other was a new method using a raised bait canister to entice the quolls to stand on their hind legs and present their ventral surface to the camera. Individuals were identified from multiple images of their unique spot pattern, and sex was determined from ventral images. The bait bag method was better for detecting quolls and both methods performed similarly in allowing observers to identify individuals from images. However, the bait canister method was superior for determining sex of individuals. Using this new bait canister method, individual identification was possible in 202 out of 206 detection events and the sex of 81% (47 of 58) of identified individuals was confidently assigned from multiple detections. This bait station design can therefore provide additional data on individual quolls and reduces the need for more invasive live-trapping techniques. This methodology could be adapted for other mammals in Australia and worldwide.

Item ID: 64436
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1836-7402
Keywords: bait station, carnivore, dasyurid, sex ratio
Copyright Information: © Australian Mammal Society 2020
Funders: Norman Wettenhall Foundation (NWF), Wet Tropics Management Authority (WTMA)
Date Deposited: 23 Sep 2020 07:32
FoR Codes: 31 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 3109 Zoology > 310901 Animal behaviour @ 50%
41 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 4104 Environmental management > 410407 Wildlife and habitat management @ 50%
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